Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Robin Low

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 99
1
Film & TV / Re: PLEASANTLY SURPRISED BY THE NEW STAR TREK: DISCOVERY SERIES
« on: 17 February, 2018, 11:38:36 am »
RE: the speech at the end. I've noticed in films and TV at the moment that characters make what are supposed to by rousing or poignant speeches or monologues but the writers aren't very good at being  succinct so they just come out as a load of old waffle.

The best thing about Prelude to Axanar (and there are a number of good things) is Ramirez' speech in Archer Arena:

We are facing an enemy that is consumed and committed to our total destruction. 
An enemy that demands to be fought, and we will fight!
But I say to you our greatest challenge is not the might of a Klingon fleet.
The greatest challenge laying before us is to do what must be done, without undoing the dream of the Federation. 
For myself, I have but one fear: Destroying the dream of the Federation.
Compared to such a loss, I DO NOT FEAR THE KLINGON EMPIRE!

In PtA this is intercut with some other comments (a bit like wossname's in Discovery), but it's short and sharp, and Tony Todd's delivery and performance is powerful. It's a pretty clear statement about the nature of Star Fleet. Yeah, if we have to fight then we'll fight and fight hard, but we'll also do our damnedest not to compromise the Federation's ideals and goals in the process.

For all the impressive things in Discovery, I can't help but compare it to PtA. There's nothing in Discovery that I'm interested in rewatching, but I find myself coming back to PtA again and again. It's like Discovery is using the iconography of Star Trek, but PtA actually understands and follows its tenets.

Oh, dear. Star Trek as a religion. Never mind.

Regards,

Robin

2
General / Re: Everything comes back after 20 years: The Prog's New Dark Age
« on: 15 February, 2018, 08:11:56 pm »
It's definitely called the S&M special from now on.

The fact that this has taken until now suggests to me that even forum has lost its edge.

Quote
I wouldn't use how excited you feel about picking up the prog as a guide to how good it is. It says more about you. Everything is more exciting when you're young.

I know what you mean and it's something I'm conscious of. That said, there's plenty of stuff in the world that's good, even in my increasingly advanced years, but unless I'm excited about it or looking forward to it or simply interested in it then how good it is doesn't really matter (to me, anyway). I rather enjoyed reading Wagner's Walk, even thought it's a dated piece of old twaddle. It's datedness made it more interesting.

Regards,

Robin

3
General / Re: Everything comes back after 20 years: The Prog's New Dark Age
« on: 15 February, 2018, 07:02:10 pm »
[Snip]list of awesome things[/snip]
Get some decent crime writers to write procedural Judge stories.

I dunno about crime writers per se (Dredd is such a tricky bugger to write, it's a lot to ask), but absolutely preferentially call for and commission procedural stories,  and indeed crazes, weird crime, stories with multiple parallel strands that aren't connected... Can you imagine something like the The Graveyard Shift appearing today?  Not everything has to involve geopolitics,  bent judges and events/people from Dredd's past. I get that Wagner has moved on with the stories he wants to write,  and the amount he's prepared to do, but to my mind that just opens up T B Grover's old stomping grounds to current writers.

Personally, I'm getting a bit tired of procedurals and reading about how the cameras are out of action/vandalised/whatever excuse it is this time. Now I think about it, there's a story to be told about the people who have to go round repairing and installing those things.

I think I'm buying and reading the Prog and Meg mostly out of habit. There are a lot of competent writers and lot of competent artists, and the occasional Dredd that makes me sit up and take notice, but there's nothing that makes me excited about picking the Prog up every week.

Trouble is, I think I've been saying that off and on for years.

Dunno what it was about the Scream and Misty special that was so much more interesting. I could imagine all of the stories appearing in the Prog, but ironically the special (dare I call it the S&M special?) felt fresher.

Regards,

Robin

4
General / Re: 2000ad All female creative teams in 2018 Summer Special
« on: 11 February, 2018, 01:51:37 pm »
Dredd is a fascist, so the alt-right already have their representation in the comic.  Oh wait, I forgot - Dredd has a liberal agenda and is not conservative enough.

Most of his best friends are women. Although he did ensure that McGruder went out in a brutal hail of bullets, and not with a peaceful, dignified injection.

Regards,

Robin

5
General / Re: 2000ad All female creative teams in 2018 Summer Special
« on: 10 February, 2018, 09:38:32 am »
Personally I'm surprised a bit more hasn't been said about the Scream/Misty special

I meant to post about it, as it certainly deserved praise. I enjoyed it a lot more than I enjoy most issues of 2000AD and The Meg. There was a nostalgia element, but the updating worked. I'd cheerfully buy Scream and Misty on a weekly basis.

And yeah, more women writers and artists please.

Regards,

Robin

6
Books & Comics / Re: Ursula Le Guin has died
« on: 24 January, 2018, 06:59:03 pm »
The Left Hand of Darkness is probably my favourite of the three - it starts as a political drama, moves to an action adventure, and finishes as a love story. All the while, she gently wraps your head around the notion of gender being completely irrelevant in all of the above. It’s such an important book, and even more so in this age of gender fluidity.

Read this last year and rather enjoyed it. Aside from the first two Earthsea books and her book about writing, Steering the Craft, and the collection of essays The Language of the Night, I'm not really familiar with her work. However, I do have several of her books on the shelves, so it's probably way past by time I took them off and read them.

She was also an eloquent and strong voice in for the genres, which only adds to the loss.

Regards,

Robin

7
Off Topic / Re: RIPs
« on: 23 January, 2018, 06:31:55 pm »
Howard Lew Lewis, I knew him as Blag in Chelmsford 123, Elmo in Brush Strokes and Rabies in Maid Marian and her Merry Men.

Oh, bollocks, that's a shame. I remember quite a few of us at school watched Brush Strokes primarily for Elmo Putney.

Regards,

Robin

8
Bets on who the Emperor is? 

Harry Mudd.

God only knows what's really going on here. It's a Mirror Universe, but is it the Mirror Universe, the one we saw in TOS, DS9 and E? Having established the existence of multiple parallel universes, I'm going to presume that the prime 'verse of Discovery is not the 'verse of TOS, TNG and so forth, on the basis of all the design and technology that doesn't match. As a geek I'm kind of fond of parallel universes, but here I guess it's going to be used as a lazy justification for Discovery not fitting coherently with previously established Trek.

Overall, it's kind of fun and I like several of the characters, but because it does feel like it's from a parallel universe I don't have so much emotional investment.

Regards,

Robin

9
Film & TV / Re: Last movie watched...
« on: 24 December, 2017, 09:05:02 am »
If anything’s ever going to be the ‘new Star Wars’ (unlikely) I’d like it to be the remake of Nightbreed. Clive Barker always intended the original to be to the horror genre what Star Wars is to sci-fI/fantasy.

Overall, it's more than a bit of a mess (although I rated it quite highly at the tender age of 19), but there are some really good moments in it. The monster designs and David Cronenberg's performance in particular stand out. I understand a Director's Cut came out in 2014, but from what I've read it's not very good, sadly.

I'd like to see a remake, as long as the monsters were physical, not CGI (I've no problem with CGI, but the quality of the physical make-up stood out in the original, so I think it's important to pay tribute to that). I can't see a remake being an 18, though - it's too good a merchandising opportunity.

Perhaps a TV series, exploring the backstories of the monsters?

Regards,

Robin

10
Prog / Re: Prog 2061 - Happy New Year, Bitches!
« on: 22 December, 2017, 12:23:40 pm »
What I find worrying (and perhaps symptomatic of a bigger problem at the Nerve centre) is there is nothing new in the issue, and as a whole the 'brand' feels as though it is a prisoner of nostalgia

To be fair, it is the Christmas issue. If there's one Prog of the year that should be nostalgic it's this one.

Regards,

Robin

11
Prog / Re: Prog 2061 - Happy New Year, Bitches!
« on: 20 December, 2017, 11:43:09 am »
So it's entirely feasible for Wulf to have an adult son by now.
Yes, entirely. Looking at the picture we have, I'm guessing Wulf must have fathered him pretty soon after his arrival in the future, making him around 28 at the oldest.
Why does he need to have fathered him in the future?

Okay, that's an interesting idea, but it would involve some more time-travel shenanigans.

Regards,

Robin

12
Prog / Re: Prog 2061 - Happy New Year, Bitches!
« on: 20 December, 2017, 06:51:36 am »
So it's entirely feasible for Wulf to have an adult son by now.

Yes, entirely. Looking at the picture we have, I'm guessing Wulf must have fathered him pretty soon after his arrival in the future, making him around 28 at the oldest.

Regards,

Robin

13
Prog / Re: Prog 2061 - Happy New Year, Bitches!
« on: 19 December, 2017, 06:00:13 pm »
Yeah, I can't honestly remember where I picked 2187 from - the dates sometimes tied in with publication + 200 years, sometimes didn't.

There are some occasional dates in SD that don't really fit with what's now regarded by many of us as definitive (definitive in the sense they're in the strip and tell a coherent story), but on the whole it's possible to do some meaningful detective work to fill out the rest.

Of course, for some of us, there's a whole other timeline to consider....

Regards,

Robin

14
Prog / Re: Prog 2061 - Happy New Year, Bitches!
« on: 19 December, 2017, 05:45:04 pm »
Wulf is killed in 2185 ("the man who for fifteen long, hard-fought years had been his only normal friend")

Which puts Alpha's death in 2186, a year ahead of where it's usually reckoned due to a 2000AD starscan-type-thingy.

If Wulf's death is very late in 2185, I can go with Steve's 2187 death date for Alpha. The issue is the anniversary of Wulf's death that crops up in The Final Solution.

Regards,

Robin

15
Prog / Re: Prog 2061 - Happy New Year, Bitches!
« on: 19 December, 2017, 05:39:37 pm »
So on the subject of upcoming Stront, do we have any idea as to how old Wulf Jr might be? I’ve always been a bit unsure of the SD timeline. How old was Johnny when he met Wulf? How old is he now? For how long was he dead? I don’t think it’s ever been Dredd-style real time, and probably left deliberately vague, but I dont’ really feel enough strip time has elapsed. On the other time, I’m getting pretty old myself...

Okay.

Alpha is born in 2150.

He meets Wulf in 2170 (well, A.D. 793)

Wulf is killed in 2185 ("the man who for fifteen long, hard-fought years had been his only normal friend")

Which puts Alpha's death in 2186, a year ahead of where it's usually reckoned due to a 2000AD starscan-type-thingy.

Based on years passed mentioned in The Life and Death of Johnny Alpha, Alpha is resurrected about 9 years later, so at least 2195.

Getting to the current date would need me digging out some back-Progs, sorry.

Regards,

Robin

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 99