Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Robin Low

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 99
1
Film & TV / Re: Last movie watched...
« on: 13 August, 2018, 08:40:58 pm »
I'm a few days late as usual, but never mind...

Did anyone else wonder how the lab, the delicate equipment and the people inside survived all that mucking about?

Probably something to do with inertial dampeners.

Regards,

Robin

2
Off Topic / Re: RIPs
« on: 11 July, 2018, 06:38:13 pm »
A legend indeed, and I'm especially sad that I've only heard this news on comics-based outlets - the due came up with Spider-Man and Dr Strange for F's sake! These are characters known literally around the world.

BBC at least did this:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-44748923

It's possible Radio 4's obituary program Last Word might feature him on Friday 16:00 (repeated Sunday 20:30).

Regards,

Robin

3
General / Re: 2018: forthcoming thrills..
« on: 11 July, 2018, 06:25:42 pm »
Couple of days late to this...

From my perspective, continuing ABC Warriors and Slaine without the unique authorial voice of Pat Mills would be a creatively worthless endeavour, just as continuing Indigo Prime and Devlin Waugh without John Smith is.

I dunno about you, but I think the voice of both Warriors and Slaine has changed quite considerably since they began, not always for the better. On that basis, I think they could stand different writers. I also liked the recent Indigo Prime (including the addition of Revere) and Devlin Waugh.

I'd like to see John Smith back, though. There's no doubt about it: Cinnabar, Killing Time and Cradlegrave are among the very best series we've ever seen in 2000AD.

Regards,

Robin

4
General / Re: 2018: forthcoming thrills..
« on: 04 July, 2018, 07:05:23 pm »
Pat Mills is not so impressed...

I'm trying to remember if he criticised John Wagner for Blood Cadets or Origins. Or when Wagner used Bad Bob Booth. Or Snap, Crackle and Pop. Or Mega-City Two. Or The Cursed Earth.

The thing about Rico Dredd... he's not much of a character. He's a bad guy with a face full of plumbing, and little in the way of personality. There's not much substance to latch onto and claim ownership of. Some, but not much.

Regards,

Robin

5
Film & TV / Re: Last movie watched...
« on: 04 April, 2018, 06:51:48 pm »
MIB3. What a fantastic film. After the grottily disappointing sequel (two-headed Johnny Knoxville?  Really?), I'd given up on the series,  but the third one is quite superb: Josh Brolin is excellent as a young Tommy Lee Jones,  and Jemaine Clement steals the show as the magnificent Tim-Curry-alike villain Boris (just Boris) The Animal. Michael Stuhlberg's Griff exhibits the most entertaining version of precog powers I've seen,  worthy of a Moore Time Twister,  and the tight plot ties up the series in a very satisfying way.  Even Will Smith is okay,  and only yet another wooden turn from Alice Eve lets the side down a little.

Giving this one 5/5 stars with extra points for getting a closeup look at the Apollo 11 launch.

We saw this at the cinema immediately after watching Prometheus. It cheered us up no end. Who'd have thought it would be the better movie by far.

Regards,

Robin

6
Megazine / Re: Meg 393 - Hard Rain!
« on: 04 March, 2018, 11:39:57 am »
Not often I feel the need to comment on 2000AD or the Meg these days, but I thought it was worth mentioning that I can't really find much fault with this issue.

Dredd was pretty good, both story and art. Lawless is a pretty good story (looking at the battle, I think Abnett's read David Brin's second Uplift trilogy), and I really appreciate the huge amount of detail Phil Winslade gives us. Devlin Waugh has been a pretty good series (I liked the ending) and again I loved the art. Not read Face the Future yet, but I'm sure it's interesting, because the Meg's articles usually are. I did read the Baikie article, though. It's good to see creator's lives and experiences recognised and remembered. Koburn is pretty good - I liked seeing the point made that you can explain or understand something without excusing or justifying it. Movie Dredd is an odd one. I've felt the previous ones have worked, but not so sure about this one so far, although it did give us last month's cover, and that was great.

In response to one of the letters, I'm more than happy to see stories like Wagner's Walk in the floppy. Rebellion have got a huge archive of stuff and not all of it's suited to trade collections. Seeing old comic strips released as comics again seems like a good idea to me.

On balance, I've been getting more from the Meg lately than the Prog.

Regards,

Robin

7
Film & TV / Re: PLEASANTLY SURPRISED BY THE NEW STAR TREK: DISCOVERY SERIES
« on: 17 February, 2018, 11:38:36 am »
RE: the speech at the end. I've noticed in films and TV at the moment that characters make what are supposed to by rousing or poignant speeches or monologues but the writers aren't very good at being  succinct so they just come out as a load of old waffle.

The best thing about Prelude to Axanar (and there are a number of good things) is Ramirez' speech in Archer Arena:

We are facing an enemy that is consumed and committed to our total destruction. 
An enemy that demands to be fought, and we will fight!
But I say to you our greatest challenge is not the might of a Klingon fleet.
The greatest challenge laying before us is to do what must be done, without undoing the dream of the Federation. 
For myself, I have but one fear: Destroying the dream of the Federation.
Compared to such a loss, I DO NOT FEAR THE KLINGON EMPIRE!

In PtA this is intercut with some other comments (a bit like wossname's in Discovery), but it's short and sharp, and Tony Todd's delivery and performance is powerful. It's a pretty clear statement about the nature of Star Fleet. Yeah, if we have to fight then we'll fight and fight hard, but we'll also do our damnedest not to compromise the Federation's ideals and goals in the process.

For all the impressive things in Discovery, I can't help but compare it to PtA. There's nothing in Discovery that I'm interested in rewatching, but I find myself coming back to PtA again and again. It's like Discovery is using the iconography of Star Trek, but PtA actually understands and follows its tenets.

Oh, dear. Star Trek as a religion. Never mind.

Regards,

Robin

8
General / Re: Everything comes back after 20 years: The Prog's New Dark Age
« on: 15 February, 2018, 08:11:56 pm »
It's definitely called the S&M special from now on.

The fact that this has taken until now suggests to me that even forum has lost its edge.

Quote
I wouldn't use how excited you feel about picking up the prog as a guide to how good it is. It says more about you. Everything is more exciting when you're young.

I know what you mean and it's something I'm conscious of. That said, there's plenty of stuff in the world that's good, even in my increasingly advanced years, but unless I'm excited about it or looking forward to it or simply interested in it then how good it is doesn't really matter (to me, anyway). I rather enjoyed reading Wagner's Walk, even thought it's a dated piece of old twaddle. It's datedness made it more interesting.

Regards,

Robin

9
General / Re: Everything comes back after 20 years: The Prog's New Dark Age
« on: 15 February, 2018, 07:02:10 pm »
[Snip]list of awesome things[/snip]
Get some decent crime writers to write procedural Judge stories.

I dunno about crime writers per se (Dredd is such a tricky bugger to write, it's a lot to ask), but absolutely preferentially call for and commission procedural stories,  and indeed crazes, weird crime, stories with multiple parallel strands that aren't connected... Can you imagine something like the The Graveyard Shift appearing today?  Not everything has to involve geopolitics,  bent judges and events/people from Dredd's past. I get that Wagner has moved on with the stories he wants to write,  and the amount he's prepared to do, but to my mind that just opens up T B Grover's old stomping grounds to current writers.

Personally, I'm getting a bit tired of procedurals and reading about how the cameras are out of action/vandalised/whatever excuse it is this time. Now I think about it, there's a story to be told about the people who have to go round repairing and installing those things.

I think I'm buying and reading the Prog and Meg mostly out of habit. There are a lot of competent writers and lot of competent artists, and the occasional Dredd that makes me sit up and take notice, but there's nothing that makes me excited about picking the Prog up every week.

Trouble is, I think I've been saying that off and on for years.

Dunno what it was about the Scream and Misty special that was so much more interesting. I could imagine all of the stories appearing in the Prog, but ironically the special (dare I call it the S&M special?) felt fresher.

Regards,

Robin

10
General / Re: 2000ad All female creative teams in 2018 Summer Special
« on: 11 February, 2018, 01:51:37 pm »
Dredd is a fascist, so the alt-right already have their representation in the comic.  Oh wait, I forgot - Dredd has a liberal agenda and is not conservative enough.

Most of his best friends are women. Although he did ensure that McGruder went out in a brutal hail of bullets, and not with a peaceful, dignified injection.

Regards,

Robin

11
General / Re: 2000ad All female creative teams in 2018 Summer Special
« on: 10 February, 2018, 09:38:32 am »
Personally I'm surprised a bit more hasn't been said about the Scream/Misty special

I meant to post about it, as it certainly deserved praise. I enjoyed it a lot more than I enjoy most issues of 2000AD and The Meg. There was a nostalgia element, but the updating worked. I'd cheerfully buy Scream and Misty on a weekly basis.

And yeah, more women writers and artists please.

Regards,

Robin

12
Books & Comics / Re: Ursula Le Guin has died
« on: 24 January, 2018, 06:59:03 pm »
The Left Hand of Darkness is probably my favourite of the three - it starts as a political drama, moves to an action adventure, and finishes as a love story. All the while, she gently wraps your head around the notion of gender being completely irrelevant in all of the above. It’s such an important book, and even more so in this age of gender fluidity.

Read this last year and rather enjoyed it. Aside from the first two Earthsea books and her book about writing, Steering the Craft, and the collection of essays The Language of the Night, I'm not really familiar with her work. However, I do have several of her books on the shelves, so it's probably way past by time I took them off and read them.

She was also an eloquent and strong voice in for the genres, which only adds to the loss.

Regards,

Robin

13
Off Topic / Re: RIPs
« on: 23 January, 2018, 06:31:55 pm »
Howard Lew Lewis, I knew him as Blag in Chelmsford 123, Elmo in Brush Strokes and Rabies in Maid Marian and her Merry Men.

Oh, bollocks, that's a shame. I remember quite a few of us at school watched Brush Strokes primarily for Elmo Putney.

Regards,

Robin

14
Bets on who the Emperor is? 

Harry Mudd.

God only knows what's really going on here. It's a Mirror Universe, but is it the Mirror Universe, the one we saw in TOS, DS9 and E? Having established the existence of multiple parallel universes, I'm going to presume that the prime 'verse of Discovery is not the 'verse of TOS, TNG and so forth, on the basis of all the design and technology that doesn't match. As a geek I'm kind of fond of parallel universes, but here I guess it's going to be used as a lazy justification for Discovery not fitting coherently with previously established Trek.

Overall, it's kind of fun and I like several of the characters, but because it does feel like it's from a parallel universe I don't have so much emotional investment.

Regards,

Robin

15
Film & TV / Re: Last movie watched...
« on: 24 December, 2017, 09:05:02 am »
If anything’s ever going to be the ‘new Star Wars’ (unlikely) I’d like it to be the remake of Nightbreed. Clive Barker always intended the original to be to the horror genre what Star Wars is to sci-fI/fantasy.

Overall, it's more than a bit of a mess (although I rated it quite highly at the tender age of 19), but there are some really good moments in it. The monster designs and David Cronenberg's performance in particular stand out. I understand a Director's Cut came out in 2014, but from what I've read it's not very good, sadly.

I'd like to see a remake, as long as the monsters were physical, not CGI (I've no problem with CGI, but the quality of the physical make-up stood out in the original, so I think it's important to pay tribute to that). I can't see a remake being an 18, though - it's too good a merchandising opportunity.

Perhaps a TV series, exploring the backstories of the monsters?

Regards,

Robin

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 99