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Messages - manwithnoname

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1
Film & TV / Re: Last movie watched...
« on: 18 January, 2018, 01:08:33 pm »
It  The effects were well done and it was satisfactorily creepy throughout.  I did have some problems with the film.  The loud blasts of noise were awful.  They took me out of the film and just ruined the effect.  Some of the kid characters were poorly fleshed out as well and I found it difficult to connect to the group as a whole because of this.  Because of this, the bleak tone of the film ended up being too bleak for me.  The horrible adults everywhere, the bullies and IT were too much antagonism for me because it wasn't offset by enough levity and/or likeable characters.  I just found it hard to get invested and the tone was just tiring me out.  I mean this wasn't the case throughout the film but it happened enough for me to start feeling bored and just wanting it to wrap up.  That all being said, it was a good film that has a lot going for it.

My opinion on the film is probably skewed because I have a fond place in my heart for the mini-series.  Specifically the kids sections.  Ever since watching it as a kid, viewing the mini-series has always had me very much invested in what the characters are doing and the danger that seems to be ever present.  I know the adult sections of the mini-series are far from great, but they had their charm (for me, at least).

Comparing the two I can't say I prefer the film over the mini-series and as it currently stands with only one film, I'd probably choose watching the mini-series over the film.  I actually think that they are both as good as each other, because the film does some really great stuff.  It just fails more where the mini-series excelled and vice-versa. 

A second viewing of the film may change my opinion, now I know what to expect.  I might also need to rewatch the mini-series to check if nostalgia might be messing with my judgement too much.

I was a massive fan of the book when I was a kid (14 or whatever), and the characters and setting really resonated. I loved it and it also really scared me. There was so much detail, so much to take in, that it felt real.

And so the mini-series, while enjoyable, didn't come close to matching the book, even though Curry was excellent.

I haven't re-watched it, or re-read the book for decades, so I watched the film thinking it would be a relatively clean slate, but no. It all came flooding (floating?) back.

I thought it was great. Scary and immersive, and much better than the mini-series. But I do agree that the film, despite being "the first half" of the book, seemed to skim over some of the characters. I remembered more about Richie Tozier and Ben Hanscom from my memories of 30 years ago, than I got from the film, it was a long running time, but the introduction to each kid was a scary vignette, and that was about it.

Bev and Bill were the only ones who had any kind of depth on screen.

But I still thought it was very good, and Pennywise was great. Maybe the problem is, like with the (truncated) two-part miniseries, there is just TOO much book to film.

It would perhaps have been better served in a high-budget Netflix series over 8-10 episodes.

2
Off Topic / Re: Life is sometimes sort of okay because...
« on: 18 January, 2018, 08:55:01 am »
The poster claimed not to have a tv and that, because of this, had not heard of the programme in question. That is all. Not having a tv does not equate to an inability to watch tv programmes. I do not own a pogo stick but that doesn't mean I am unable to jump up and down.

There's been some disagreement about the original statement. I too surmised that the non-ownership of a TV had somehow been the reason that the poster hadn't heard of Spa Wars.

However, a more recent post (above) by MIK disputed that was the intention of the post, and that the fact the poster hadn't heard of Spa Wars was not in fact related to owning a TV, but rather the inference was that not having a TV was a good thing, because it meant that the poster wouldn't actually be able to WATCH Spa Wars.

So here we are. How does the poster watch Television programmes without a TV?

I would suggest that actually the poster in question CAN watch TV programmes, via alternative screens/ devices, and could actually watch Spa Wars (if they had heard of it, and were inclined to watch it), but instead chose to bring into the discussion the fact that they didn't own a TV, as if that somehow placed them on a higher intellectual plane, and a more discerning consumer of Television, than people who do own TVs, and might actually watch Spa Wars.

Hopefully the OP can confirm.


I really don't see why I should have to defend myself to somebody who's spent a number of posts over the past few pages attacking me.

I think you might be overreacting a bit. I don't have a clue who you are, and I don't care. It was also not meant as any kind of 'attack' even if, by definition, this would hardly be worthy of the word, given that there's been no abuse, threats, violence, or any sense of anything remotely like an attack.

May I suggest a calming Spa visit?

3
Film & TV / Re: Last movie watched...
« on: 17 January, 2018, 09:08:00 pm »
Dunkirk. You download scores of obscure podcasts, if you're me, and listen to recorded lectures and debates on the most dull topics, delivered by the most diverse proponents boredom can spawn, and you think you're getting a handle on things. You know that war is either a profitable scam run by the 1% on the rest of us or a consequence of small groups of people with too much power acting all like hard-ons in the name of Stupidus, the occult god of stupidity, arrogance and penis envy. Or a mixture of the two. Probably.

Whatever. WWII was no different; a clusterfuck caused by elite douchebaggery of one form or another and paid for with ordinary human lives. Small lives caught like grain between the quarrelling millstones of big lives. All those people, on all sides, who would rather be left alone to live their lives in peace but get pressed into the service of the state whether they like it or not. A clusterfuck aided by the elite douchebaggery of their rape and humiliation of the German people after WWI. A clusterfuck exacerbated by the greed and psycopathy of a pack of ravening bankers and industrialists. A clusterfuck facilitated through the Prussian method of public education and the private trivium method. A clusterfuck ignited by a bigot with an Oliver Hardy moustache and fanned by liver-spotted fists filled with dollar bills. A clusterfuck of clusterfucks. The Perfect Clusterfuck.

Ahem.

So, if you're me, you approach films like Dunkirk with a certain tonnage of cynical baggage.

I enjoyed it.

That last deserved a line of its own because it surprised me. Logically, I know that any depiction of a historical event is a feeble shade of the actual event in itself; shallow and narrow and subjective. All a film of this type can be is a reflection of the mythology woven by the winners. I was surprised at how deeply this British myth still affects me, and what a superb job of reflecting this particular myth the film does. (I should probably clarify that I do not use the word "myth" in a derogatory sense. I am given to understand that myths are lessons in how to be human, and it is in this sense that I call Dunkirk a myth.)

If Dunkirk is a myth, and I think it should be, then it is a myth worth telling. A myth teaching us what happens when the authorities reach the limits of their illusory* power. When we get to your actual ragged edge, what's left, propping it all up? People. People just like you and me, but generally younger. People doing their best to survive the grind of those expensive millstones. And that, to anyone with the stamina to read this far, is worthy of mythologising. This film, I think, does a commendable job in that respect.

I loved the rhythm of the film, the way it progressed from moments of calm to moments of sheer terror. The depiction of the rapidity of encroaching waters is terrifying enough to ensure I suffer disquieting dreams tonight. Kenneth Brannagh stole the show for me. His one line, "Home," brought an actual tear to my eye. Tom Hardy's Spitfire pilot was the heart of the myth, for me. It doesn't matter about all that shit I typed at the beginning of this post novella, this is what matters. To draw a line against the night with every action you take or decision you make and to never, ever give in.

Like I said, a myth worth having.

TLDR: Dunkirk. I thought it was okay.

* trust me. Go on, be brave...

I enjoyed your superbly overwrought satirical review more than the film, which bored me.

And the fact that it wasn't satire makes it even funnier and more enjoyable.

4
Film & TV / Re: Detectorists
« on: 17 January, 2018, 03:22:25 pm »
Definitely worth a go - the phrase "gentle comedy" is usually a TV euphemism for "not funny" but this is warm touching and beautifully observed. Toby Jones is outstanding

Everyone in it is pretty awesome, but Jones is the standout; Lance is just a great character and Jones plays the role beautifully and naturally.

And yeah, "gentle" is often bandied around as a negative, and it has been cruelly described as "Last Of The Summer Wine for Millennials", but they're just mean people, and not every comedy needs tragedy, snark or bitterness.

It's true that it isn't exactly a gag-a-minute like Father Ted or whatever, but it's just great and I don't like anyone who disagrees.

That sounds so like my favourite: 'Early Doors' a great gentle comedy.

Ah, yes. I enjoyed that too. Although Detectorists makes Early Doors look like "It's Only Sunny In Philadelphia"

By way of explanation, the major protaganists in "Detectorists" are a rival metal-detecting duo, and the vicious interchanges are mainly about the what name they use for their detecting club, the quality of their equipment, which pub they drink in and who has the rights to detect in which field ("This is our permission!")

It's like a bucolic version of The Wire sometimes

5
Film & TV / Re: Detectorists
« on: 17 January, 2018, 02:25:31 pm »
Definitely worth a go - the phrase "gentle comedy" is usually a TV euphemism for "not funny" but this is warm touching and beautifully observed. Toby Jones is outstanding

Everyone in it is pretty awesome, but Jones is the standout; Lance is just a great character and Jones plays the role beautifully and naturally.

And yeah, "gentle" is often bandied around as a negative, and it has been cruelly described as "Last Of The Summer Wine for Millennials", but they're just mean people, and not every comedy needs tragedy, snark or bitterness.

It's true that it isn't exactly a gag-a-minute like Father Ted or whatever, but it's just great and I don't like anyone who disagrees.

6
Music / Re: What's everyone listening to...?
« on: 17 January, 2018, 01:44:40 pm »
Hmmm- never got on with Peel myself- he always seemed a little 'too' willing to experiment (Much like Lard over on 6music) but I do like to listen to Lauren Laverne (10am on 6) and I make a point to catch up with the Electric Ladyland show (also on 6) and the various new music shows are normally good there too.

Well, yeah. There was also his obsession with "The Mighty Fall" to contend with, a band with which he was seemingly incapable of having any sense of critical discernment.

Although I'm reading Steve Hanley's book at the moment, and it's pretty funny.

7
Music / Re: What's everyone listening to...?
« on: 17 January, 2018, 01:12:20 pm »
I need some suggestions of where I can hear new music.

I don't like radio as a rule, but used to listen to Peel obviously. There's no real alternative around that I can find, apart from maybe Marc Riley on Radio Six, and that's almost always shit.

Any pointers?

8
Film & TV / Re: Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi
« on: 17 January, 2018, 01:06:56 pm »
If it isn't big robots, monsters, superheroes or exploding cars, non-Chinese films have zero chance of success in China.

Hmmm, now you mention it TLJ didn't have a monster, did it?  Very odd. Even Rogue 1 had a monster*.




*RotS didn't have one either, but only because Obi-Wan's fight with a water monster on Utapau was apparently cut during filming.

I'm not sure a fleeting appearance of a monster would quite cut it with the Chinese. It needs to have monsters in it ALL THE TIME, and ideally stars a monster as the main character.

"The Adventures Of Sarlacc - HE EATS LADIES!" for example, might have worked

9
Off Topic / Re: Life is sometimes sort of okay because...
« on: 17 January, 2018, 12:55:28 pm »
12 cinema visits per year makes you a "heavy" cinema-goer; far higher than the national average.

Too right...! Twelve or fewer? It's an unusual year if I go to the cinema twice, to be honest!

Yeah, sounds about right. Xmas is a given, because everyone's at home and there's almost always a Star Wars film out (and before that LOTR and Hobbits). That's one.

This year Blade Runner 2049 was the other.

Oh, wait, do films you only go to because your children want to watch them count? I don't think they should, but if so, you can add Lego Ninjago, Thor:Ragnarok and Guardians Of The Galaxy 2 to that list.

I'm almost a "medium" cinema-goer!

10
Off Topic / Re: Life is sometimes sort of okay because...
« on: 17 January, 2018, 12:30:18 pm »
I don't listen to much radio, usually only R4XTRA, don't take cabs, hardly use the interweb (just this place and a few others), stopped reading newspapers and magazines years ago, live in a shed and work on a farm. Apart from the odd cinema visit, which happens on fewer than twelve occasions in a year, I'm probably just about as ad-free as it's possible to get without sawing my own head off.

You are the Unabomber, AICM£5

12 cinema visits per year makes you a "heavy" cinema-goer; far higher than the national average. Luckily you can take your seat late enough to avoid the deluge of ads before the film, if you time it right anyway.

Do any UK cinemas NOT have ads? I wonder. Maybe some of the indies?

Anyway, you are deffo the least advertising-exposed person I have ever come across. How do you know what to buy?

11
Film & TV / Re: The Punisher TV series whats the verdict? worth catching?
« on: 17 January, 2018, 12:25:04 pm »
Still a couple of episodes from the end (I'm not one for bingeing!) but I think it's excellent. I'm not sure how much resemblance it bears to Punisher comics in general and he's spent basically zero time in the suit so far but it's a striking depiction of the damage done to men who serve and a brutal de-romanticisation (is that a word?!) of people we generally refer to as heroes.

It's well-written and surprisingly thought-provoking, with some decent action sequences thrown in and some sly commentary on male friendship.

The Punisher doesn't really have much of a suit, unless a black T-shirt with a big white skull on it counts. I suppose it does. That an a large automatic weapon.

Have to say I've been really enjoying the current comic storyline, where he very much does have a suit (but it's War Machine's and he's nicked it and is flying around being proper grumpy Frank in it). Good stuff!

Hang on, is War Machine the black Iron Man fella from the films?

A psychopathic murderous Iron Man? Aces!

12
Off Topic / Re: Life is sometimes sort of okay because...
« on: 17 January, 2018, 12:00:09 pm »
Well, I can only say that my life feels a lot better since brightly coloured whirleygigs of illogic stopped trying to tell me that my existence without this commemorative plate would be futile, without that brand of underwear I'll die alone or only this other kind of cheese will validate me in front of my peers. I really don't care about what it pays for, I just want it out of my brain. If that causes the television industry to collapse then that's fine - I'll read a book.

You only need to swerve radio (cab drivers and builders LOVE radio), never go to the cinema, install ad-blockers that can identify native advertising content (not invented yet), avoid all social media, never read a newspaper or magazine and also never leave the house, in order for your non-advertising personal utopia to become a reality.

Best of luck

13
Film & TV / Re: Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi
« on: 17 January, 2018, 11:51:31 am »
https://screenrant.com/star-wars-last-jedi-chinese-theaters/

A Western film that makes a big deal about a young student coming to learn at the feet of a grumpy but venerated master storyline, only to go off on one saying that this whole sub-genre is a load of bullshit lapped up by morons, and Asian audiences weren't keen on it for some reason?  Even Sherlock Holmes can't solve this mystery.

Given how TLJ social media evangelicals usually take criticism of the film, I fully expect them to be calling for war with China any minute now.

If it isn't big robots, monsters, superheroes or exploding cars, non-Chinese films have zero chance of success in China.

14
Film & TV / Re: Detectorists
« on: 17 January, 2018, 11:43:37 am »
Turns out this is going to be the last series for Detectorists.

I thought it was actually supposed to end after Series 2 and the Xmas one-off, so the third series was a lovely surprise, even if it wasn't quite as good as the previous two.

A brilliant programme, gentle, funny, clever and nice. Loved it.

15
Film & TV / Re: Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi
« on: 17 January, 2018, 11:33:57 am »
TPM in 4th spot?

Have to say I’m just a little surprised.

Ah RotJ isn't that bad.

 ;)

I like Return Of The Jedi. Rounded the trilogy off perfectly. Yeah, there's issues with it, but after the grimness of the previous chapter, I think a bit of happiness and light was justified.

Mind you, I was about 12 or 13 when I watched it for the first time.

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