Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 

Author Topic: CRISIS and New Statesmen: the little comics nobody loved  (Read 5532 times)

JayzusB.Christ

  • Member
  • Bionic Fingers
  • *****
  • Posts: 5867
  • Squealing meat.
    • View Profile
Re: CRISIS and New Statesmen: the little comics nobody loved
« Reply #60 on: 23 June, 2015, 04:30:27 pm »
Not a bother - I suppose I couldn't have offered Sebastian O and Kid-Eternity as extras so you've done alright.  Actually they're two comics I've never read either - any use?
“Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest”

pert

  • Member
  • Sub Basement Sewer Unit
  • *
  • Posts: 24
    • View Profile
Re: CRISIS and New Statesmen: the little comics nobody loved
« Reply #61 on: 27 June, 2015, 04:55:22 pm »
I wouldget 3rd World War if it got released anthology style

Frank

  • Member
  • Bionic Fingers
  • *****
  • Posts: 7098
    • View Profile
Re: CRISIS and New Statesmen: the little comics nobody loved
« Reply #62 on: 09 September, 2017, 06:18:04 pm »

A very general overview marking the anniversary of the launch, but David Moloney makes the interesting observation that the organisation to which Eve, Paul, Trish, Gary and Ivan were conscripted - Market Force - shares its name with IPC/Maxwell's in-house distribution arm.

Might be a coincidence*, but I'm sure those creating the comic had a few run-ins with the organisation charged with pushing it on retailers - especially when they discovered the superhero comic they were promised had become Socialist Worker.**

CAN YOU HANDLE IT?

http://www.greatnewsforallreaders.com/blog/2016/9/17/on-this-day-17-september-1988-crisis


* The name is, of course, a play on the market forces doctrine so voguish among the Monetarist school of economics that dominated the eighties, provided the ideological underpinning to Thatcherism, and rationalised the natural inclination of the government to be a bit cunty.

** In his memoir, Mighty One, McManus describes justifying the shift in subject matter on the grounds that environmentalism had politicised the youth. In evidence, Mac-1 haughtily informed the assembled suits that Enya was currently number one with a single whose chorus was SAVE THE WHALE, SAVE THE WHALE, SAVE THE WHALE (p261)

O Lucky Stevie!

  • Member
  • Evil Cyborg
  • ****
  • Posts: 2334
  • Walks like an Eloi. Talks like a Morlock.
    • View Profile
Re: CRISIS and New Statesmen: the little comics nobody loved
« Reply #63 on: 15 September, 2017, 07:21:16 am »
On a related note, surely Stevie isn't the only reader who noticed back in 1989 that the first book of Third World War was just a re-write of the original series of A.B.C. Warriors minus the clanking big robots?
"We'll send all these nasty words to Aunt Jane. Don't you think that would be fun?"

Richard

  • Member
  • Posting Machine
  • ***
  • Posts: 1495
    • View Profile
Re: CRISIS and New Statesmen: the little comics nobody loved
« Reply #64 on: 15 September, 2017, 08:19:38 pm »
It was a bit better than that.

Professor Bear

  • Member
  • Bionic Fingers
  • *****
  • Posts: 6128
    • View Profile
    • Your Friends and Neighbors
Re: CRISIS and New Statesmen: the little comics nobody loved
« Reply #65 on: 15 September, 2017, 09:05:14 pm »
On a related note, surely Stevie isn't the only reader who noticed back in 1989 that the first book of Third World War was just a re-write of the original series of A.B.C. Warriors minus the clanking big robots?

Until you pointed it out, I never noticed that Pat Mills sometimes covers the same ground in different comics.  I'm now increasingly certain that I'm not imagining that some of his work contains criticism and satire of Western capitalism.  I also detect a subtle inference that war may not be good.