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Author Topic: Thrillpower Overload: the missing chapters  (Read 4775 times)

Frank

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Re: Thrillpower Overload: the missing chapters
« Reply #75 on: 18 October, 2017, 05:28:31 pm »

FROM THE DESK OF CHARLES LIPPINCOTT

Charles M Lippincott went to film school with Spielberg and Lucas, and his first job was as an assistant to Hitchcock on Family Plot. Lucas hired him to wrangle publicity and stoke anticipation in the fan community for Star Wars, a role he reprised for Ridley Scott's Alien.

While in London for Alien, Lippincott picked up 2000ad and was so taken by Judge Dredd he bought the feature film adaptation rights from IPC. After a period working for Dino De Laurentis, on projects such as Conan and Flash Gordon, Lippincott began work on what would become the 1995 Judge Dredd movie:


'So Howard Chaykin, of the Marvel Star Wars comics fame, went to Hollywood and got involved in doing stuff other than comics. A multi-talented guy, Howard not only draws, he also writes stuff like AMERICAN FLAGG, which I understand has just been greenlit for production.

So we're doing Judge Dredd. This is in the early days. Howard comes in for a meeting with this friend of his. They sit down, and then Howard proceeds to pitch this story idea for Judge Dredd. He really gets into it. He gets wound up and tells this great story. It's really great. It's got everything. Action. Good vs evil. Great characters, the whole works, with a great story arc

As is our habit, rather than discussing the pitch with him and his buddy, we wait until the meeting is over to see how we all feel. Eureka! We have a consensus. We all agree Howard gave a great pitch, capturing the essence of Judge Dredd in the exact kind of movie we want to make.

We decide to jump on it. We let Howard and his buddy know we love it, and want to work out a deal. Send us a synopsis or treatment, and we'll start the paperwork. Well, a few days go by, and we haven't heard from Howard.

So I have to track Howard down and ask him, "What's the deal?" Turned out Howard was stoned when he did the pitch. He did it off the top of his head,and couldn't remember what he said. Which was too bad, because it was really a great pitch'.



Follow Charles on Facebook or his blog, From The Desk Of Charles Lippincott.



JOE SOAP

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Re: Thrillpower Overload: the missing chapters
« Reply #76 on: 18 October, 2017, 09:31:34 pm »
'Judge Dredd as The Lone Ranger' is an old yarn but it's a good 'un.



« Last Edit: 18 October, 2017, 09:33:23 pm by JOE SOAP »

Frank

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Re: Thrillpower Overload: the missing chapters
« Reply #77 on: 18 October, 2017, 09:46:24 pm »

Dredd's the opposite of the Lone Ranger. He's like a plumber. A very violent plumber.



Frank

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Re: Thrillpower Overload: the missing chapters
« Reply #78 on: 27 October, 2017, 08:47:33 pm »

TILTING AT PAT MILLS

What we're finding with Millsverse, printing things like Dave Kendall's Psycho Killer (from Toxic) and Carlos Ezquerra's Judge Dredd and 2000ad Colouring Book, is that you can have print on demand for full colour books. So the days when you were in hock to a publisher are completely gone.

People think they need to get a publishing deal, then they discover that the advance isn't enough to live on and the marketing you'd expect them to do is your responsibility - you're expected to run the social media campaign. If we're going to take back control, we have to develop those skills.

In the case of Psycho Killer, we arranged distribution ourselves, and the advance orders were higher than Accident Man, which is printed by Titan (and has been adapted into a film starring Scott Adkins, out in January). So a major publisher is holding us back.

I met Carlos and he told me Rebellion didn't have the capacity put the book out on his behalf, so had given him their blessing to publish it himself. There's lots of things to learn; for example, we discovered that if we called it an adult colouring book, the tax man would want a chunk of it.

I revealed in my book (Be Pure, Be Vigilant, Behave) that I hadn't had a pay rise in twenty years, and surprise-surprise, my page rate shot up significantly and I got a message from Rebellion saying it was 'long overdue' - with which I heartily agree.

Various creators got in touch to say they'd had similar experiences to me. In one case I asked if it was okay if I mentioned what happened to them in a future edition and they said no. This was something that happened around twenty years ago; that's how down trodden creators have become.

Freelancers today are isolated individuals, & hence down trodden. John Wagner, Alan Grant and myself were all members of the NUJ. Nobody in their right mind would touch DR & Quinch or Halo Jones, and there's a sorry history of other creators taking over my strips and proving a disaster.

Would anyone want to follow Dan Abnett on Sinister Dexter, or any of Gordon Rennie's various occult series? If these or my strips are so important to the survival of the comic, the way to do that is the French model, where the original creators receive a share of the profits.

Because I feel ill served by previous publishers of 2000ad, I've made it so damn difficult for any hungry hack to follow me on ABC Warriors or Sláine. I've deliberately blocked the usual routes hacks take reviving a series - if you're so bloody talented, go create your own characters!

There's a slow process of killing me softly; Greysuit, Visible Man - one by one, my characters are falling. Colin MacNeil did one series of Defoe and didn't want to continue; Matt has been looking for a successor since the Spring, but it's fallen by the wayside.

I have to find artists and arrange samples myself, but I no longer enjoy the influence I once did. SMS has said he'd be interested in working on Misty material, which Keith Richardson seems receptive to, but Fay Dalton is doing pulp covers for Titan.

I learned just today that Rebellion have no plans to reprint Finn in 2018 or the foreseeable future , although they will reprint it at some point. They assure me there's no agenda to this; other strips, including some from Valiant and Lion, have priority.

Provided Clint Langley gives his approval, we'd like to publish American Reaper through the Millsverse imprint, and the success of Be Pure means we're looking at whether a book looking more closely at Sláine, Marshal Law, or girls comics could do the same.

Simon Bisley assures me he's working on our Joe Pineapples solo story, but if we had a better rights deal he'd have finished it long ago. He's doing it as a labour of love, so every time someone offers him better money to work on a film or something, it gets put to one side.

I can't remember the last time Rebellion asked me to create a new character, because they know I'll ask for a better deal. That's why it's a challenge getting fresh ideas and creators into the comic, and new ideas & characters are what used to have film people interested in adapting strips.

The pay and rights situation is why creators don't give 2000ad their best new ideas. That's why you have so many old strips coming back, but there's only so long you can run on empty. The days when creators were knocking on 2000ad's door are gone, and sooner or later the well of people who grew up wanting to work on the comic will run dry.

With regard to Simon Roy's recent Dredd strip and Ben Willsher's ghost cover, I have sympathy with artists cutting corners, because they're paid so poorly. I can tell from some artist's work that they're depressed; in some cases, they're subsidising 2000ad's low page rates.

Fay Dalton's already building a name for herself in advertising and with Titan; there's going to come a day when creators like her are no longer even walking through the door.



The rest of the interview's light hearted and entertaining; I've just excerpted the doom laden sections because I'm a miserable sod. Listen to the unabridged version of this Patchat, including Mills's thoughts on the Misty Special, HERE



Tiplodocus

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Re: Thrillpower Overload: the missing chapters
« Reply #79 on: 30 October, 2017, 09:57:12 am »
Just a suggestion/some feedback but (given most people are fans of the work itself and not too bothered* about the behind the scenes stuff) wouldn't it be better to extract the light hearted and fun bits of the interview? And then add a post script that says "Pat also expands on issues he has experienced with rebellion and the state of the comics industry in general and that makes for an I interesting read; follow this link"


* that's not to say creator's rights is not an important issue. Is there somewhere we could actively assist them in their campaigning?
Be excellent to each other. And party on!