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Author Topic: Whats everyone reading?  (Read 428769 times)

Rara Avis

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6285 on: 26 October, 2017, 06:26:08 pm »
Thank you Mardroid.

Now that you mention him, I have been wanting to re-read 'Ghost Story' by Peter Straub

Smith

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6286 on: 04 November, 2017, 09:27:03 am »
DC Universe by Alan Moore.Its nice to have it in one place,but its a bit of a mixed bag,and for obvious reasons doesn't include Killing Joke.
To summarize,Superman stories are great,GL are pretty good;GA,Vigilante and Omega Men are average,and Wildstorm stuff is pretty weak.

Theblazeuk

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6287 on: 06 November, 2017, 01:08:03 pm »
Conversely I couldn't penetrate The Dark Tower and much preferred the dark, surreal brevity of The Gunslinger

I dusted off Sonic The Comic.So many memories.  :)

I reread all mine about 5 years ago. Was great! Odd to see some now-famous names in there (Mark Millar) and some legends in their own time like Brendan (drawing Decap Attack). Like a mini-prog in many ways with stories like Eternal Champions or Kid Chameleon, including some really dark stuff where you might not expect it.

Dark Jimbo

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6288 on: 06 November, 2017, 02:46:55 pm »
I dusted off Sonic The Comic.So many memories.  :)

I reread all mine about 5 years ago. Was great! Odd to see some now-famous names in there (Mark Millar) and some legends in their own time like Brendan (drawing Decap Attack).
[/quote]

Decap Attack was only ever McMahon and Nigel Kitching. Very much prog-like all round though, innit? Suppose that's only natural when it was made by so many prog alumni...

Smith

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6289 on: 06 November, 2017, 02:52:27 pm »
Well,Megadroid used to be Tharg.Actually,several of them.

Smith

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6290 on: 10 November, 2017, 06:43:33 am »
This is the second time I read Quantum and Woody omnibus,and I still have no idea what the hell is going on.Series sequel is even worst in that regard.
One of the "deleted scenes" is Quantum and Woody trying to kill Mark Waid by dropping Kurt Busiek on him.:D

Apestrife

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6291 on: 14 November, 2017, 10:22:03 am »
100Bullets and it's spin off Brother Lono by Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso.

A story I feel I could and should read more often. I'm often reminded of some hard earned truths by it. While I remember most of the story the way it's structured makes the story's twists and turns feel like a great part of a song. It never feels old.

Agent Graves walks up to people who's lives been ruined and offers them an attache with a gun, 100bullets, evidence against the one or ones who ruined this person's life as well as a guarantee that if the gun is used then no law enforcement can touch them. It sounds easy on the paper, but it's far far from. Slowly the story on how and why these revenge attaches are handed out also starts to show.

While 100 bullets is deeply cynical and pulpy, it's also full of heart. People can do some unbelievable despicable things in this story, but you can still feel for them. Which I think is due to how believable the characters feel. No matter how outlandish the plot, or that characters tend to speak in constant wordplay, it feels like there's something actual that drives these people.

Apestrife

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6292 on: 14 November, 2017, 10:42:39 am »
Does androids dream of electric sheep by Philip K. Dick

Been 20 or so years since I last read this one. Picked it up after the watching 2049. While I like story in Blade runner 2019 and 2049 better, I still really liked the book. Especially the bits with the animals. A thread I wouldn't mind a possible future Blade Runner movie picking up on. Also mercerism.

I'm aching to read this one again by just writing about it :) But first I'll read a scanner darkly and Man in the high castle.

Btw. Anyone read Philip's The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch? I've seen in book shops. Any good?

O Lucky Stevie!

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6293 on: 17 November, 2017, 05:59:24 am »
Btw. Anyone read Philip's The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch? I've seen in book shops. Any good?

It was so good that the esteemed Paul Di Filippo paid tribute to it in the Top 10 series that he wrote for America's Best Comics. Recommended.
"We'll send all these nasty words to Aunt Jane. Don't you think that would be fun?"

O Lucky Stevie!

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6294 on: 17 November, 2017, 06:12:56 am »
Whilst we are on the subject of PKD, Stevie's personal favourite would be have to be Dr Bloodmoney.

Has anyone here had the courage to tackle this 1000 page housebrick selections compiled by Jonathan Lethem from PKD"s private journal documenting and exploring his religious & visionary experiences yet?


"We'll send all these nasty words to Aunt Jane. Don't you think that would be fun?"

Andrew Williamson

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6295 on: 20 November, 2017, 11:50:41 am »
Does androids dream of electric sheep by Philip K. Dick

Been 20 or so years since I last read this one. Picked it up after the watching 2049. While I like story in Blade runner 2019 and 2049 better, I still really liked the book. Especially the bits with the animals. A thread I wouldn't mind a possible future Blade Runner movie picking up on. Also mercerism.

I'm aching to read this one again by just writing about it :) But first I'll read a scanner darkly and Man in the high castle.

Btw. Anyone read Philip's The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch? I've seen in book shops. Any good?

I read Do Androids? just before the movie came out, so 35 years for me. The things that I remember most are the bits with the animals (as you mention), and the concept of kipple - the worthless rubbish lying around in drawers that seems to multply when you're not looking. Trust me, it's real!

I recently promised myself more PKD, and so far I've read Man in the High Castle and Martian Time-Slip, both of which I enjoyed immensely. I quite fancy The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch next.

von Boom

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6296 on: 22 November, 2017, 06:50:29 pm »
The View From The Cheap Seats. A collection of Neil Gaiman's essays, introductions, and speeches. Extremely interesting reading.

TordelBack

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6297 on: 26 November, 2017, 11:17:31 am »
So much reading at the moment, all of it light (escaping pressures of work): don't know where to start listing it all.  Mills' dual billet-doux/j'accuse to British comics is discussed elsewhere, but as for the rest.

A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, Marina Lewycka. Interesting novel, which manages to combine heartfelt insights on the inter-generational immigrant experience, grotesqueries, the shockingly short human timescale of the 20th C, and some surprisingly solid info on the history of tractors.  What I apparently missed is what all the reviewers who adorn the cover saw in the 'funniest book ever', 'comedy novel of the year': it's amusing alright, but unless you find narrators smugly oblivious to their privilege, deep-rooted family trauma and terrified elderly men soiling themselves to be a boundless fount of comedy, I'd ignore the hype.  Definitely a compellingly breezy read though, finished it in two sittings.

The Quantum Thief, by Hannu Rajaniemi.   By contrast I struggled to sustain interest in this Arsene-Lupin-in-Space jargon-fest, apparently the first of a trilogy that I probably won't be continuing with.  On paper it seems like it should read something like Jim diGriz as written by Alastair Reynolds, but for a short book it just goes on and on flitting through layered identities and high-concept post-human solar system intrigues but without a single character I gave a monkeys about.  Maybe I'm getting too old for this kind of SF.

The Heroes, Joe Abercrombie.  Apparently I missed a book (Best Served Cold), chronologically speaking, but this fifth Circle of the World outing drops you straight back into the familiar slogging-then-fighting-then-limping-away world of the North so it feels you've never been away.  I found the audaciously bleak end of the First Law trilogy frustrating, only in so far that I wanted to know what happened next, and for some of the characters here is the muddy answer.  There's nothing brilliant about Abercrombie's writing, and nothing original about his setting, but he creates such strong-if-superficial characters that following them about their universally grim, despairing, utterly shallow business is deeply diverting.  And at the back of your mind there's always the chance that the Bloody-Nine isn't as dead as absolutely no-one thinks he is...  Great mindless stuff,  Game of Thrones as written by Bernard Cornwell, or possibly Sharpe as written by George RR Martin, I dunno: mud, blood and doomed pig-headed men, take your pick.
« Last Edit: 26 November, 2017, 11:19:30 am by TordelBack »

Apestrife

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6298 on: 27 November, 2017, 06:55:36 pm »
It was so good that the esteemed Paul Di Filippo paid tribute to it in the Top 10 series that he wrote for America's Best Comics. Recommended.

Thanks for the input!

Picked up Ubik, which I've read before. But I'll pick up The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch after reading it.

Got Do androids dream of electric sheep, Man in the high castle, Ubik, A scanner darkly, and it feels like it'll fit good next to those.

Colin YNWA

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Re: Whats everyone reading?
« Reply #6299 on: 27 November, 2017, 09:09:51 pm »
So I'm reading Jason Aaron and R.M. Guera's Scalped and I'm really enjoying it... kinda... its really good if it gets a little frustrating quite how hard its trying to be hardnosed and down to heel. It took me a while to get into it as it bangs so heavily on the door of cliche... heck sometimes it gets let in... well even worse at times it finds and joins in the party behind that door... but at time its bloody good.

It wasn't until the third trade Dead Mothers that just a stunning bit of crime fiction. There's some absolutely brilliant characters in there Red Crow being the obvious one but then there's some bloody walking cliches. The bitter and corrupted FBI agent Nitz is the worst, but Bad Horse is another real culprit. He's so the damaged hero, beyond caring and so has nothing to loose. Hard and sexy as hell... just so done.

Then you get Red Crow... a fantastic character but again a contridiction as he's just cliche done well. The crime boss a corrupted good guy, still trying to do right but doing it the wrong way cos its the only way he knows. Fighting hard for redemption, but not knowing how. Its so done... but in his case, as opposed to Bad Horse rarely done so well and engagingly.

And there we have it Scalped its fantastic, but fantastically cliched at the same time. Still a joy to read and an absolute page turner and Guera's art is just stunning and so right for the series.