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11
General / Re: Top 2000AD moments of the last 25 years
« Last post by Magnetica on 19 November, 2018, 10:37:51 pm »
Space is a premium for me too, but I am doing it  anyway...but its not sustainable...but I carry on regardless  :lol:
12
General / Re: Top 2000AD moments of the last 25 years
« Last post by sheridan on 19 November, 2018, 10:33:06 pm »
I do wonder how much nostalgia clouds a comparison of the first 15 years of 2000AD and the last 25 years.

And I am only drawing the line there because the question on this thread was about the last 25 years - I would actually end the early part sooner. But anyway..

...I tend to think I prefer the earlier stories and artists but as Tordel's say this exercise is good to show there is also a lot of great stuff in the more recent era.

When I think about it, there is another factor at play...I have simply read and re-read the early Progs so much more than the recent ones and so they are more ingrained in my mind.

It is why, for instance I felt no need to buy the Apocalypse War in the Mega Collection, but snapped up Tour of Duty - I have read those original Progs with AW in them so often, but had never re-read ToD. And it is only on a re-read that I am happy to place it as the equal of things like The Apocalypse War, Judge Child, the Day the Law Died etc.

It is a bit like when I only had a handful of albums, I could name every song, now I have hundreds, I can't

I agree with absolutely everything you've said there (except for buying collections of things I already have in their comic form - space is too much of a premium for me).
13
General / Re: Top 2000AD moments of the last 25 years
« Last post by Magnetica on 19 November, 2018, 10:30:23 pm »
I do wonder how much nostalgia clouds a comparison of the first 15 years of 2000AD and the last 25 years.

And I am only drawing the line there because the question on this thread was about the last 25 years - I would actually end the early part sooner. But anyway..

...I tend to think I prefer the earlier stories and artists but as Tordel's say this exercise is good to show there is also a lot of great stuff in the more recent era.

When I think about it, there is another factor at play...I have simply read and re-read the early Progs so much more than the recent ones and so they are more ingrained in my mind.

It is why, for instance I felt no need to buy the Apocalypse War in the Mega Collection, but snapped up Tour of Duty - I have read those original Progs with AW in them so often, but had never re-read ToD. And it is only on a re-read that I am happy to place it as the equal of things like The Apocalypse War, Judge Child, the Day the Law Died etc.

It is a bit like when I only had a handful of albums, I could name every song, now I have hundreds, I can't
14
Film & TV / Re: Current TV Boxset Addiction
« Last post by Jim_Campbell on 19 November, 2018, 10:24:37 pm »
I have no idea what satire even IS these days. I may just check myself into a nursing home and content myself with going “tsk” at the Today programme and failing to finish even the cryptic crossword in the Daily Telegraph.
15
Film & TV / Re: Current TV Boxset Addiction
« Last post by Professor Bear on 19 November, 2018, 10:10:22 pm »
She-Ra and the Princesses of Power will probably be more noted for the furore in which overgrown man-babies who did nothing to raise the profile of the franchise or enable the rebooting of the property in the 30-odd years since the original ended still felt they were entitled to complain loudly on the internet that the female concept artist hadn't drawn the lead characters with big enough tits, because while I enjoyed it while it lasted, it doesn't really have much meat on it and is a bit forgettable.
On the subject of She-Ra's tits redesign, Adora in this is like 12 or 13, with She-Ra being a scaled-up version of Adora, so the reason she looks like she does is to make it apparent that She-Ra is a child, hence the lack of sexualisation.  I feel this bit of context tells you everything you need to know about certain internet jerks.  She-Ra's talking horse is also a communist who has named himself for "The SWIFT WIND of revolution", which I am sure will be taken in good humor by those who have despised the show since before they even saw a single frame of it.

The Horde are living beings now - they used to be legions of robots captained by evil monsters, which sidestepped any awkward morality issues, but now they're all kids with names and distinct personalities drawn from the tribes of conquered peoples and forced into military service where they commit atrocities and are in turn killed by those people who dare to fight back.
Another change from the original is that whereas She-Ra used to travel the world as a vagabond teaching people to reach out to their enemies in the name of friendship, now the golden-haired living incarnation of a sun goddess seeks to teach everyone how to be violent guerrillas inflicting lightning raids upon their enemies so that She-Ra can form an alliance of "princesses" who rule through a mix of birthright and magical destiny manifest through superpowers granted by their staying in one specific area and keeping their bloodlines pure enough to utilise the power in the soil.  Um.
I also get a weird vibe from the credits sequence, as the lyrics sound suspiciously like the first draft of something that would be chanted at meetings of a right wing youth organisation before an incoming political officer decided to dispense with any pretense and just put in all the overt stuff about crushing the untermensch.  "We are on the verge of greatness, we must seize our destiny and be strong" - that kind of thing.
Anyway, I think it might be a bit early to call this as some kind of standard-bearer for the cause of SJW cultural Marxism, but it's also very generic and has changed genres from science fantasy to magical girl anime not a million miles away from something like Winx or Glitter Force. The animation is relatively crude but does the job (I certainly prefer it to the cheap and ugly CGI on Star Wars: Resistance), the voice cast is mostly okay but as usual for Netflix animation is stuffed with Aussie accents - the sooner we go to war with Australia the better - and I wish it was a lot better than it is, but it's merely "okay".
I suspect 8-13 year old girls may get more out of this than I did, as will people who don't like queer coding, because buddy, there is zero coding in this: lesbian couples just lez up onscreen, a male character tries to seduce a male guard to escape prison, the lead character rides around on a talking unicorn that flies using the power of rainbows, the main villainess even sleeps on the bed of the protagonist curled up like a frigging cat.  It's a real mystery why all those 30-40 year old single dudes on the internet dislike this.
16
Books & Comics / Re: Alan Moore thinks you're a prick!
« Last post by Frank on 19 November, 2018, 10:07:09 pm »

Part Three of The Tempest has been put back to December, but as O'Neill says, nobody's ever read a comic they loved and said 'that was brilliant; if only it had come out on schedule'. And Leah Moore is well enough for Twitter.

The following has definitely been posted here before, but I defy anyone to (re)read this and still be mad at Moore for telling us all to grow up and read Joyce:

In 2013, a then-9-year-old boy named Joshua wrote to his hero, Alan Moore, the genius responsible for writing such classics as Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

Dear Alan Moore

I am writing because I want to know more about your comics including V for Vendetta, Watchmen, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and Swamp Thing. I also want to say thank you for making such amazing graphic novels and how did you make such wonderful things?

The first book I saw was V for Vendetta which has a brilliant storyline and is very cool when he blows up Parliament. I also love his awesome mask. Watchmen was the second, so far the best book I have ever seen - Rorschach is my favourite character, then Dr. Manhattan, lastly the Comedian. I like the way he uses a flamethrower as a cigar lighter and a smiley face for a badge. My third favourite was the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. I like the way it’s more like a book because it has lots of writing in it and I also like the things that they have collected. All in all you are the best author in human history. Please write back.

Joshua

--------------------

Dear Joshua

Well, first of all, thank you for a lovely letter. I apologise if this reply is a bit short, but I’m working really hard on about six different things at once just now, and I know that if I put replying to you off until later when I had more time then I might lose your letter (you should see all the books and papers and clutter filling nearly every room in my house), or not get back to you for some other reason. After your kind words about me and my writing I really didn’t want to do that, so here I am in an odd half hour between finishing one piece of work and starting another.

I’m really pleased that you’ve enjoyed so much of my stuff, and especially because most of my readers these days are people almost as old as I am. Of course, I appreciate my audience however old they are, but it’s particularly gratifying to think that I’ve got intelligent and adventurous readers of your own age out there. It’s the kind of thing, when I’m taking my vitamin pills and swilling them down with Lemsip, that makes me feel like I’m still ‘down with the kids’.

Books like Watchmen, V for Vendetta and Swamp Thing were done back when I was just starting my career in the 1980s, when I was in my twenties or thirties. I’m glad they’re still enjoyable today, and as for how I wrote them...well, I suppose I’d have to say that I started out, when I was your age or a little younger, by being simply in love with comics or books that were full of brilliant ideas that set my imagination on fire. From a very young age, I was trying to emulate the people whose stories I was reading by writing little stories or poems or even little comic books drawn in coloured biro on lined jotter paper and then stapled together. I’m not saying that these things were any good, but that I had tremendous fun doing them and that they at least taught me the beginnings of the skills that my writing would need in later life.

As well as writing and drawing, I was also reading as much as I could about the things that interested me...this is why libraries are so important...whether that be in books or comics or any other medium that I could get my hands on. When I was reading things, part of me (probably the biggest part) would just be enjoying the story because it was so exciting, or scary, or funny or whatever, while another part of me would be trying to work out why I’d enjoyed whatever it was so much. I tried to understand what it was that the author had done that had had such a powerful effect upon me. It might be some clever story-telling effect that had tickled my brain, or it might be a powerful use of symbolism that had struck a deep, buried chord inside me, but whatever it was I wanted to understand it because I figured that if I understood these things, I’d probably be a better writer than if I didn’t.

As I got older, while I found I still enjoyed a lot of the books and comics I’d grown up with, I found that I was becoming able to appreciate all sorts of other writings and art that I hadn’t been able to get to grips with before, and I started to apply the lessons that I’d learned from these different sources to my writing. Thus, when I finally entered the comic field in my late twenties, I’d probably got a much wider range of influences than most of the other writers in the field at the time and was able to produce work that was very different to what had been seen before. I liked to experiment with things (I still do, for that matter), and to try and think of a different way that I could write a specific scene or a specific story. I think that one of the most important things for any artist or writer is that they should always be progressing and trying new things, because that is what will keep your work feeling fresh and lively to your readers even after twenty or thirty years. Yes, it means that you have to work harder, and to think harder, and to generally keep pushing yourself and testing your limits, but in my opinion the results are definitely worth it.

Although I’m still very proud of the work that I did on all the books mentioned above, the fact that I no longer own any of those titles (I’m afraid they’re all owned by perhaps-less-than-scrupulous big comic-book companies) means that I’m always most interested in my most recent work, so I was glad that you’d liked The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, which Kevin and I still own and have a great deal of fun doing. I know that a very clever young man named Jess Nevins runs a website at which he picks through all of the volumes of The League and points out all the different books, plays, films and stories that we’re making references to. Although a lot of the books mentioned might be pretty boring until you’re older, there’s a few of them that you might really love, and some of them might help you to enjoy The League a bit more.

Speaking of The League, I’m enclosing a couple of things with this letter, including a copy of the brand new Heart of Ice book. In case you haven’t seen League volume III, Century, (which isn’t out in collected form yet) the main character in Heart of Ice is the original Captain Nemo's daughter, Janni Dakkar, who somewhat reluctantly took over her father’s command of the Nautilus when he died of old age in 1910. Heart of Ice shows Janni attempting to recapture some of her father’s past glories and ending up running into a scenario from the work of American weird tale master, H.P. Lovecraft. As well as this, I’m also including a couple of pages of unlettered art that I’ve received from Kevin for the next book in the series, which is entitled The Roses of Berlin. Nobody except me, Kevin and our publishers have seen these yet, so this is a special preview just for you. Please guard them with your life (not literally, of course), and don’t let them get onto the internet or anywhere...I mean, I’m sure you wouldn’t dream of such a thing, but it’s just that Kevin puts such a lot of work into these pages, and he wants people to see them when they’re properly lettered and coloured and everything, and part of the actual story that they’re intended for. Anyway, I hope you enjoy them.

Well, I’ve just looked at the clock and realised that I’d better get down town (Northampton) if I want to get my wife Melinda a present for our wedding anniversary on Sunday. Thanks again for a great letter, and thanks for calling me the best author in human history, which I don’t necessarily agree is completely true but which I may well end up using as a quote on the back of one of my books someday. Oh, and please give my regards to Naseby. It gets more than a couple of mentions in my forthcoming novel Jerusalem, which I’m about two chapters away from the end of at present.

Take care of yourself, Joshua. You’re obviously a young man of extraordinary good taste and intelligence, and you confirm my suspicion that Northamptonshire is a county touched by the gods.

All the best, your pal —

[Signed ‘Alan Moore’]
(Best Author in Human History. In your face, Shakespeare, Joyce and Cervantes!)

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2016/07/you-are-best-author-in-human-history.html



17
Megazine / Re: Meg 402 - All Along the Watchtower...
« Last post by Freddychopper on 19 November, 2018, 09:58:20 pm »
Great issue with the Meg on top form as usual. Always like the wraparound covers and the ones lately by Winslade and Percival's last month have been top notch!

Good Dredd one off this month with a nice original new look to Dredd (you'll know what I mean when you read it!). Not seen Mack Chater's art before but he has a solid style.

Lawless contnues its widescreen action packed run with some insane battle scenes but I still do long for some more black areas in the art to separate things a bit but this is still a quality strip and has the best looking snow plow I've ever seen!

The Carlos tributes are wonderful and bring a tear to the eye with a great selection of anecdotes and memories from top talent, past and present. I particularly liked Garth Ennis' recollections. The floppy this month is a nice selection as well and great to see the original idea for the Judge Dredd logo.

The Torture Garden has the Dark Judges living up to their name with some gruesome deaths all delivered by Nick Percival's wonderful painted art. So atmospheric and great use of colours and lighting. Also interesting to get a take on Judge Death philosophy behind killing and hints at a bit more substance to the motives of the Dark Judges.

Just need to read Blunt and Storm Warning (which looks ace) but I've been told I have to return to finish watching I'm A Celebrity. Drokk!!
18
Announcements / Re: 2000 AD - The Ultimate Collection
« Last post by Colin YNWA on 19 November, 2018, 09:37:40 pm »
That's incredible. No-one's heard of bubble wrap even? 

Didn't you watch Doctor Who this week!
19
Other Reviews / Re: The completely self absorbed 2000ad re-read thread
« Last post by Colin YNWA on 19 November, 2018, 09:28:36 pm »
Prog 999

Well here we are tonight we're going to party like it Prog 999... which back in the day seemed an unimaginable amount. Now less than half way and we have a Prog 1999 which would make that sentence much better anyway!

We get two endings I'd like to talk about. I should also mention that Finn finished in this Prog as well (and I think that's it for the series?) but have to be honest by now I'm barely reading it, so haven't got much to say.

The two ending I'd like to mention are therefore The Pit and Strontium Dogs. The Pit is just glorious, Dredd soap opera. By apparently reducing scale and giving us a closer, tighter view on a smaller world we actually get raised stakes. We can hardly begin to imagine what 400,000,000 deaths means. Its too big, beyond imagination even. Show us a team of Judges running a guerilla war, or a hand picked crack squad on a suicide mission and the impact of Apocalypse War is felt all the more.

The Pit does this even better. We get closer and tighter to characters. By throwing Dredd into a situation he doesn't belong in, by giving him a true ensemble cast of well defined character, each with a tale to tell, an arc to go through a world is built and we are completely immersed. Then we get to the ending... and what's superb is its so Dredd. So big, so brash and bold. Its not exactly something we haven't seen before, but it works. Having been sunk into the world, so superbly crafted by John Wagner we get the explosive finale to throw us back into Dredd and what makes his world work. Of course having been sunk in so deep it has all the more impact.

The Pit is everything its said to be. Maybe not my all time favourite Dredd epic, but its sure as heck up there.

Then contrast that with Strontium Dogs. Over a much longer time we have also had an ensemble cast created. We're had characters thrown in different directions and situations. We also have lots of interconnecting character arcs. And as I've said I've enjoyed it, it'd been fun and once you get past the fact that its not Strontium Dog and is meant to be something different its really fun.

Now I'm not saying for a moment that the world is crafted as deftly and engagingly as the one Wagner creates in Sector 301, but its still fun and sure things could have been said to have been allowed to drift, but it deserved a better send off than it got. Now the reasons for this are well known to those who have read their 2000ad history and David Bishop has said himself he could have handled the specifics a lot better. The one thing that gets over looked is to make matters worse (and I say this as a Bishop booster - always remember he left the Prog in a much better place than he found it, at what was a very challenging time by all accounts) he bloody wrecked the story that had been developed.

I've no idea what ideas he'd kept of Peter Hogan's and which he added himself (or whomever he gave the story over to) but I'm reasonably positive it would have been given more space and time to end properly. Characters and situations slowly drip feed into life are snatched away so quickly and clumsily. Now you'd imagine if you weren't happy with what was being done and how long it was all taking your best bet was to cut your loses and wrap it up toot sweet. If however you have been enjoying it you feel robbed of what might have been.

So it goes.

Kinda get the impression that Trevor Hairsine wasn't impressed either. Now if this was with the way things were to start with, or how things were wrapped up I can't say. I prefer to think the latter.

Anyway lets move on from both the good and the bad as we got a big celebration coming up next time... I think I'll give myself a quick break and re-read Si Spurrier's sublime X-Men Legacy before cracking on with the 2nd millenium AD. See ya soon.
20
General / Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Last post by sheridan on 19 November, 2018, 08:52:41 pm »
I thought it was funny in the latest episode covering 426 where Conrad and Fox puzzled over why the US letter had the address stated as Fargo, USA without mentioning the state. The state seems superfluous to us and is never used in the UK, although US music acts touring Europe will sometimes state 'London, England', 'Glasgow, Scotland', 'Paris, France', etc on their tour posters. It looks odd to us, as it implies we could be confused and think they mean another London/Glasgow/Paris if they do not state the country.


That's Chief Judge Fargo to you, citizen!


Re: London, England - I blame Ontario!
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