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Author Topic: Chainsaw Warrior and Brett Ewins  (Read 1985 times)

Mangamax

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Re: Chainsaw Warrior and Brett Ewins
« Reply #15 on: 06 April, 2011, 08:15:13 pm »
Did he use photocopies?
Know he used tracings, as i have this:



And there were a whole bunch more like it, so assumed that's how he went about it.
The perspective on that chairs all wrong

Jim_Campbell

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Re: Chainsaw Warrior and Brett Ewins
« Reply #16 on: 06 April, 2011, 10:42:34 pm »
Did he use photocopies?

Unless he used to cunningly increase the stroke weight when inking as he enlarged the images so that the process looked exactly like photocopying, then, yes, he used to photocopy a lot of panels. The ones he wasn't tracing, obviously.

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maryanddavid

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Re: Chainsaw Warrior and Brett Ewins
« Reply #17 on: 06 April, 2011, 11:03:21 pm »
I loved that effect, especially in Bad Company, I alway felt it added a lot of atmosphere to the story, the increasing close up of Danny was used to bring home the gravity of whatever terrible situation he found himself in.  One of my favourite artist at the time I dont like his later style used on Tim Kelly.
I have some of those tracings as well and I was under the impression he used a projector and the tracings to produce the photocopy effect.

David

TordelBack

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Re: Chainsaw Warrior and Brett Ewins
« Reply #18 on: 06 April, 2011, 11:22:55 pm »
I loved that effect, especially in Bad Company, I alway felt it added a lot of atmosphere to the story, the increasing close up of Danny was used to bring home the gravity of whatever terrible situation he found himself in.  

Me too, I loved the whole effect - I was initially irritated by it, then got really into it, especially the blurry strokes as they got larger.  I understand why it and other 'borrowings' in his work annoy some folk, and indeed why he sometimes gets less-than-fulsome praise, but between Dredd, Anderson, Rogue and Bad Company Ewins was at one time my favourite 2000AD artist.

I have some of those tracings as well and I was under the impression he used a projector and the tracings to produce the photocopy effect.

This I did not know!

Jim_Campbell

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Re: Chainsaw Warrior and Brett Ewins
« Reply #19 on: 06 April, 2011, 11:29:35 pm »

I have some of those tracings as well and I was under the impression he used a projector and the tracings to produce the photocopy effect.

I'm afraid I simply don't believe that Ewins drew those panels so that they looked photocopied. And, even as a kid, I felt seriously short-changed when half a page would be exact reproductions of the same headshot. And that's before we get to the swipes from other artists, or the tracings of photographs. Reference is one thing, but blatant swiping… well, if you (generic, not aimed at you M&D) are OK with it, fair enough, but I'd hope you can understand why I'm really not.

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John Caliber

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Re: Chainsaw Warrior and Brett Ewins
« Reply #20 on: 13 April, 2011, 10:15:04 am »
I can understand why some artists would choose to duplicate panel artwork. Sometimes it's a response to the script droid providing too much dialogue to fit in a panel, the  artists' creative response to duplicate the panel artwork and divide up the speech balloons between. In Rogue Trooper's case, GFD didn't seem the type to overload panels. There's a certain logic in stepping dialogue this way to keep the story's momentum going - every time the reader has to spend longer processing the odd panel with a denser text content, it retards the story's flow.

Just imagine how the Brett Ewins of old would have dealt with a five-page 'talking heads scenario' written by Garth Ennis!
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