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Author Topic: NFL in the UK  (Read 3518 times)

COMMANDO FORCES

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #15 on: 27 October, 2013, 06:49:21 PM »
I watched it years ago when Mick Luckhurst did the highlight show on Channel 4. I enjoyed that but a full match would bore me, with all the breaks, stop starts, etc... I understand it's all spectacle, with all the other stuff but I'd be there for the game, nothing more, nothing less!

Jo-L

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #16 on: 27 October, 2013, 07:17:25 PM »
A friend who's into it explained to me that John Madden is a rubbish commentator, is this true? I know nothing about the sport.

Madden (now retired) became a bit of a joke - especially in his later years.  He was a great coach in the 70's, and had a big, charming personality, but wasn't a very good commentator.  One big slam on him was that he liked to state the obvious.  Things like "What they want to do here is to score some points so they can win the game" or "In this play, they are trying to stop the other team from getting a first down".  Pat Summerall was his co-commentator, and really carried that team for many years.

Buddy

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #17 on: 27 October, 2013, 09:49:45 PM »
I seen Miami in the first Wembley game a few years ago and they are playing next year.

I might be going to the Abu Dhabi GP next year but if that doesn't work out I'll try go see the Dolphins beat the Raiders. Although with the way Miami play these days it could go either way.

Albion

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #18 on: 27 October, 2013, 10:43:37 PM »
Where's large48 when you need him?  ;)
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Simon Beigh

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #19 on: 28 October, 2013, 12:08:14 AM »
Sky Sports do a decent job in covering it in the UK. Like others, I learnt about it in the Channel 4 highlights days in the 80's and my Dad used to go on business to Boston, so I had New England Patriots stuff (and am still a fan of them). When Channel 4 stopped showing it, I stopped watching it, but recently discovered it on Sky Sports and enjoy their coverage. The endless stop / start is broken up by reports from other games and general chit-chat.

The rules and complex and cumbersome. The Patriots lost the other day on a technicality (someone got a helping push, apparently) which was very annoying. I understand the basics, and just let the rest wash over me. Americans love their stats, so they spend a lot of time talking about that when the game stops.

I'm in the US at the moment, and the thing that really gets me is College and High School Football! What's that about? I guess there's not male professional division except the NFL. So, unlike proper football (soccer) where there are lower divisions, they cover college and high school. That's weird... What next? Kindergarten?

I've also heard talk of a London based team. Just like you hear talk of a Premier League football team based in Asia. It's stupid and I can't see it happening. As to the Wembley thing, it's a novelty, but I can't see huge crowds week in, week out...

locustsofdeath!

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #20 on: 28 October, 2013, 12:33:49 AM »
College football is actually very good, very intense when two good teams play.

American Football is not a boring game at all once you know the nuances of the game. It is very much like a chess match, and you can really get into it when you recognize the offensive formations and see how the defenders adjust to those formations before the snap of the ball. It's not just big dudes smashing into each other.

J0-L, I'm an American who lived in the UK for six years (been back in the States for two now). I actually played a season on Bury St. Edmonds football team, and it was pretty fun. While I was there, the popularity of the sport grew and I noticed more and more folks talking about it before I returned to the States.

Mister Pops

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #21 on: 28 October, 2013, 12:40:24 AM »

I'm in the US at the moment, and the thing that really gets me is College and High School Football! What's that about? I guess there's not male professional division except the NFL. So, unlike proper football (soccer) where there are lower divisions, they cover college and high school.

As I understand it, there were once lower amateur leagues, but people died. So now you can only play the full blooded version of the sport in NFL approved institutions. Anyone can start in high school, but if you don't get a football scholarship to go to college, you'll never play a full contact blood and thunder game ever again. Which I think is a bit sad.
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maryanddavid

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #22 on: 28 October, 2013, 12:44:00 AM »
My in-laws love the game, all Irish American,  I never could get a feel for it, but from what I gather its a real day out/in with the  game taking so long.
This side of these isles, football refers to a different game again, so soccer is a a word that is used in this house.

Simon Beigh

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #23 on: 28 October, 2013, 12:53:03 AM »
College football is actually very good, very intense when two good teams play.

American Football is not a boring game at all once you know the nuances of the game. It is very much like a chess match, and you can really get into it when you recognize the offensive formations and see how the defenders adjust to those formations before the snap of the ball. It's not just big dudes smashing into each other.

Yeah, it is like chess - that's a good comparison. I like to watch American Football, I just don't get all the positions and strategies. A bit like chess for me! I'm afraid I have never grasped what a 'Safety' or 'Tight End' is - positions like 'Corner Back' and 'Running Back' are more obvious. Like I say, I get 'fumbles', 'shotguns', 'wide opens' and 'blitzes' but the more subtle stuff is over my head.

I wonder if it is like cricket in that it is better to grow up with it and actually play it to get an appreciation of everything that goes on? I find test match cricket fascinating, but that's a different conversation :)

Mister Pops

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #24 on: 28 October, 2013, 01:20:38 AM »
This Penny Arcade Web-comic explains it perfectly to gamer-nerds:



While this Kotaku* article expands on the idea.

*Kotaku is a terrible, unoriginal site full of crass churnalism, for your own good, for your own sanity DO NOT read anything else from these hack bastards.
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Jo-L

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #25 on: 28 October, 2013, 01:27:57 AM »
As I understand it, there were once lower amateur leagues, but people died. So now you can only play the full blooded version of the sport in NFL approved institutions. Anyone can start in high school, but if you don't get a football scholarship to go to college, you'll never play a full contact blood and thunder game ever again. Which I think is a bit sad.

I don't know anything about all that.  There are a bunch of amateur leagues, but they're mostly full of players aren't quite good enough for the NFL.  NFL Europe was more or less a farm-team league for the NFL while it was around, but it was mostly populated with non NFL-caliber talent.

Most professional NFL players don't have very long careers.  I think the average is like 3-5 years.  The NFL is ultra-competitive, and the longer you play the harder it is on these guys' bodies.  College players come in right after they've played 4-5 years at a very high level, and they are at their peak physical condition.  At that point, either they are going to be able to make an NFL team, or they likely never will.  No need for a farm team given those choices.

College is essentially a professional league here.  College teams play in 100,000 seats sold-out stadiums, and the players and coaches are on the news every day.  I live in a state where we don't have a professional team, so the University team here basically rules the state.  EVERYONE watches the game.  The streets and stores are pretty much emptied during the game.  The bars are full, and there's RED everywhere.  It's pretty fun actually, though I could see the phenomenon would be completely weird if you didn't grow up with it.

Mister Pops

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #26 on: 28 October, 2013, 01:46:02 AM »
As I understand it, there were once lower amateur leagues, but people died. So now you can only play the full blooded version of the sport in NFL approved institutions. Anyone can start in high school, but if you don't get a football scholarship to go to college, you'll never play a full contact blood and thunder game ever again. Which I think is a bit sad.

I don't know anything about all that.  There are a bunch of amateur leagues, but they're mostly full of players aren't quite good enough for the NFL.  NFL Europe was more or less a farm-team league for the NFL while it was around, but it was mostly populated with non NFL-caliber talent.


I will of course defer to your superior knowledge. Those Non NFL-calibre players, would they still have come through the college football system, or would they be more like Sunday League teams in association football? A bunch of enthusiastic (maybe overweight or at least not exactly fit) mates who cobbled together enough men for a squad and play against a buncha similar fellas.
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Jo-L

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #27 on: 28 October, 2013, 02:15:38 AM »
As I understand it, there were once lower amateur leagues, but people died. So now you can only play the full blooded version of the sport in NFL approved institutions. Anyone can start in high school, but if you don't get a football scholarship to go to college, you'll never play a full contact blood and thunder game ever again. Which I think is a bit sad.

I don't know anything about all that.  There are a bunch of amateur leagues, but they're mostly full of players aren't quite good enough for the NFL.  NFL Europe was more or less a farm-team league for the NFL while it was around, but it was mostly populated with non NFL-caliber talent.


I will of course defer to your superior knowledge. Those Non NFL-calibre players, would they still have come through the college football system, or would they be more like Sunday League teams in association football? A bunch of enthusiastic (maybe overweight or at least not exactly fit) mates who cobbled together enough men for a squad and play against a buncha similar fellas.

Yeah, pretty much every pro football player is going to have come through college.  It's where you go to learn how it all works, and there's a lot to know.  Football is a pretty amazingly fast game strategy wise.  It's full of secret codes and constant game planning and adjustments.  The semi-pro leagues, Arena ball, and Canadian football is where the guys go who want to play, but didn't make it in the NFL.  Also, you'll see older ex-NFL players in those leagues.  Occasionally you'll see a guy come out of those leagues and make it in the NFL.  Kurt Warner is a really great example of a guy who didn't make the NFL out of college, went to the arena league, got another shot, and then became a superstar.

(American) Football is hugely popular here, so even in the semi-pro leagues, most every player is going to be in top shape.  Lineman are an exception.  You often see giant fat guys who do a perfectly adequate job of guarding the line.

I don't claim to be an expert on anything btw, I'm just another enthusiastic spectator.

Jo-L

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #28 on: 28 October, 2013, 02:27:22 AM »
College football is actually very good, very intense when two good teams play.

I go back and forth between college and NFL.  I typically like the NFL more, just because it's better technical play.  College however, can be way more emotionally intense.  There's only a few games a year, and losing any of those games can mean the end of the season.  The players are literally all kids going through whatever 18-22 year olds go through, which as a former 18-22 year old I can attest to as being a tumultuous time in one's life.  The crowds are usually packed with rabid fans, and you're on campus where they've spent all week getting ready for the big game.

American Football is not a boring game at all once you know the nuances of the game. It is very much like a chess match, and you can really get into it when you recognize the offensive formations and see how the defenders adjust to those formations before the snap of the ball. It's not just big dudes smashing into each other.

I think the chess analogy is apt.

J0-L, I'm an American who lived in the UK for six years (been back in the States for two now). I actually played a season on Bury St. Edmonds football team, and it was pretty fun. While I was there, the popularity of the sport grew and I noticed more and more folks talking about it before I returned to the States.

Cool! - spreading the good word.  I keep hearing Roger Goodell talking about setting up shop in London, so I've been real curious about the perception of the NFL over there.  From the small sample here, it sounds like it's generally more of a curiosity than a valid opportunity for a franchise.  i'm sure he's got a better research team than i do though.

locustsofdeath!

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Re: NFL in the UK
« Reply #29 on: 28 October, 2013, 02:27:30 AM »
I wonder if it is like cricket in that it is better to grow up with it and actually play it to get an appreciation of everything that goes on? I find test match cricket fascinating, but that's a different conversation :)

Yes! There was a cricket team in Ely where I lived, and every Sunday I'd take a walk down to the field and sit and watch and try to figure out what the hell was going on, haha.