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Author Topic: Space Spinner 2000AD  (Read 42658 times)

Pyroxian

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #795 on: 19 September, 2018, 09:43:46 am »
Hmm, I'm missing out the mystical power of Seven, as taught to us by Deadlock and Uncle Pat.  Must slot in another meal somewhere.  Midnight feast, maybe?

Elevenses?

The Legendary Shark

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #796 on: 19 September, 2018, 12:32:02 pm »

How could you forget tiffin? Tiffin is an Indian English word for a type of meal. It can refer to the midday luncheon or, in some regions of the Indian subcontinent, a between meal snack , or in South Indian usage, a light breakfast. When used in place of the word "lunch", it does not necessarily mean a light meal.

(Wikipedia)


Steve Green

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #797 on: 19 September, 2018, 01:03:13 pm »
America has its public holidays, we have unnecessary meals.

The Legendary Shark

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #798 on: 19 September, 2018, 01:09:12 pm »

And, of course, oop north, we call work breaks 'baggin'.


Dandontdare

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #799 on: 19 September, 2018, 02:12:45 pm »

And, of course, oop north, we call work breaks 'baggin'.

errrm - do we? As a Lancastrian who didn't move further than Manchester, I can safely say I have never heard this. (must be a West Lancashire thing  :))

sheridan

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #800 on: 19 September, 2018, 02:29:51 pm »
Ten posts explaining our geographical confusion about what to call our evening meal.  :lol:
Ah the joys of living in the British Isles.
I'm looking forward to the episode about how we pronounce the word Scone.

 :P


Nobody tell the 'mericans how to pronounce it - I want to hear what they call it untainted by our opinions!

sheridan

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #801 on: 19 September, 2018, 02:30:35 pm »
When I wert lad, we had breakfast at home, lunch at school (during the dinner break, served by dinner ladies, who weren’t posh), tea at home, and any other food we ate was a snack.

Brunch, high tea and supper were mythical meals provided to posh people.


When I were a lad we had one meal a week, and count meself lucky :)

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #802 on: 19 September, 2018, 05:43:54 pm »

And, of course, oop north, we call work breaks 'baggin'.

errrm - do we? As a Lancastrian who didn't move further than Manchester, I can safely say I have never heard this. (must be a West Lancashire thing  :))

Maybe it's a really local village thing. I believe it derives from farm workers taking butties and other snap with them into the fields in a bag so they didn't have to walk back to the farmhouse for some scran. Whatever, the call "baggin time" is always a welcome one!


Funt Solo

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #803 on: 19 September, 2018, 06:56:25 pm »
The only supper I was aware of was fish'n'chips

I'd forgotten about chip shop suppers.  That means that this sentence makes sense: "It's nearly tea-time and I don't know what to make for dinner: let's just go to the chip shop and have a fish supper."

---

On a completely unrelated topic, I remember enjoying the early Rogue Trooper series (up to where Space Spinner is right now) much more than Conrad or Fox seem to.  I really enjoyed the art: Cam Kennedy's hoppers are my favorite, the tech (giant tanks and Nort glider troops) and the weird idea of a world at war consumed by chem clouds.  This may be the hazy rose-tinted spectacles of a youth long gone, and today I might not dig it so much, but my memories of the series are generally positive.

(Now, Horst, on the other hand...)
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Frank

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #804 on: 19 September, 2018, 07:17:50 pm »
I remember enjoying the early Rogue Trooper series (up to where Space Spinner is right now) much more than Conrad or Fox seem to

They're reading a bunch of progs at a time.

I enjoy any individual episode of original Rogue Trooper - the art's usually great, the action's exciting, and the ideas and characters are memorable - but reading an entire series (certainly the longer series) in one go usually turns into a chore.

I wasn't reading at that time, but I'm pretty sure they'd have read just fine on a weekly basis, which is what they were meant to do.



sheridan

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #805 on: 19 September, 2018, 08:35:22 pm »
On a completely unrelated topic, I remember enjoying the early Rogue Trooper series (up to where Space Spinner is right now) much more than Conrad or Fox seem to.  I really enjoyed the art: Cam Kennedy's hoppers are my favorite, the tech (giant tanks and Nort glider troops) and the weird idea of a world at war consumed by chem clouds.  This may be the hazy rose-tinted spectacles of a youth long gone, and today I might not dig it so much, but my memories of the series are generally positive.

(Now, Horst, on the other hand...)

Yes to both of those, loved them at the time and love them now, right up to where Conrad and Fox have read up to (and published, because they've probably read up to the egg virus thing).  I liked the next bit, right up to when the re-chipped GIs hit Horst.  I even liked the bit after Horst, with art by Steve Dillon, and Hit One.  It was after that when it was clear there wasn't any real plan for the Hits that original Rogue lost his lustre.  I've not read any of the Hits since Hunted gave the TG a motive for being a traitor (which ties in to the hits).

Steve Green

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #806 on: 19 September, 2018, 08:39:15 pm »
Re-reading the hit, 'the princess is in another castle' got old very quick.

I'm not sure how they managed to screw it up so badly.

If it had been 4-6 episodes a hit run over a year, and variety in targets/situations I think it would be remembered much more fondly.

Funt Solo

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #807 on: 19 September, 2018, 10:30:32 pm »
The great Steve Dillon art was far and away the best thing about the Hits sequence.

Horst was such a disappointment, but seems inevitable.  As they said on the podcast, once you find the one-armed man, the adventures of Dr. Kimble aren't very compelling.  (But now you take Dr. Kimble and stick him in a jungle.  It's still not interesting.)

Nu Earth itself was a great character, though.  Maybe I wish that Cinnabar could somehow have multiplied itself out over time to give us more of whatever made it so great.

But the great reboot happened instead.
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SpaceSpinner2000

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #808 on: 20 September, 2018, 04:08:29 am »
I remember enjoying the early Rogue Trooper series (up to where Space Spinner is right now) much more than Conrad or Fox seem to

They're reading a bunch of progs at a time.

I enjoy any individual episode of original Rogue Trooper - the art's usually great, the action's exciting, and the ideas and characters are memorable - but reading an entire series (certainly the longer series) in one go usually turns into a chore.

I wasn't reading at that time, but I'm pretty sure they'd have read just fine on a weekly basis, which is what they were meant to do.

We've talked about that on the show a couple times. The similarity of the plot lines definitely become visible if you read a bunch in a row. Plus the nature of Rogue's story means that there aren't the occasional weird, wacky, or epic stories that can break up that monotony in other long-term thrills like Dredd. I think we talked on the most recent show about how there's something about Rogue and Nu-Earth that makes it different from Invasion, which being another every prog GF-D story seems like Rogue's closest comparison. Maybe the nature of Rogue and the conflict he's fighting in makes the over the top stuff less engrossing than Bill Savage's shoot 'em ups? I'm not sure.

Also, I can't believe how much conversation and differences there is about daily meals around various parts of the British Isles! For the record I think the standard US pronunciation for scone is just the word "cone" with an s on the front, and I'm terrified to learn what the other ways of saying it are!
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Funt Solo

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Re: Space Spinner 2000AD
« Reply #809 on: 20 September, 2018, 06:20:40 am »
Scone (skon) can rhyme with bon (as in bon appetit): this is how it was said in my house.  I consider this the non-posh "correct" version.

Scone (skone) can rhyme with bone: posh version.

Scone (skoon) can rhyme with boon: this is just for Scone Palace and the village of Scone (in Scotland).

The Internet, of course, has a pie chart:



By the way, that's pie rhyming with eye.  Unless you're from Dundee, in which case it's pie rhyming with ray.

Just to combine the meal time debate with the scone debate, here's high tea:



Next up: is a Jaffa Cake a biscuit?
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