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Author Topic: Real life accidents on film/tv sets  (Read 4236 times)

milstar

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #15 on: 15 October, 2021, 11:47:52 PM »
DiCaprio on the set of Django, cut his hand and it ended up in the film.

Yes, and Leo stayed in the character for the whole scene.
Reyt, you lot. Shut up, belt up, 'n if ye can't see t' bloody exit, ye must be bloody blind.

Rara Avis

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #16 on: 16 October, 2021, 09:04:44 AM »
Poor Kerry Washington!

Tom Cruise broke his ankle doing a jump in one of the MI movies, kept running and that scene made it into the movie afaik.

How could we know mention Jackie Chan in every single one of his movies.

Hawkmumbler

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #17 on: 16 October, 2021, 03:52:04 PM »
Can't believe Ken Ogata actually committed suicide at the end of Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters.

Absolute giga chad.

rogue69

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #18 on: 22 October, 2021, 05:03:11 AM »
Recently on the set of the film RUST, Alec Baldwin fired a prop gun on set accidently causing the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and wounding director Joel Souza.

https://variety.com/2021/film/news/alec-baldwin-rust-incident-santa-fe-1235094931/

wedgeski

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #19 on: 22 October, 2021, 09:01:13 AM »
Recently on the set of the film RUST, Alec Baldwin fired a prop gun on set accidently causing the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and wounding director Joel Souza.

https://variety.com/2021/film/news/alec-baldwin-rust-incident-santa-fe-1235094931/
If it could fire bullets and kill people, it wasn't a prop gun. Someone fucked up royally there.

Dandontdare

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #20 on: 22 October, 2021, 12:11:43 PM »
Doesn't need to fire bullets, it's often blanks that kill people

Jim_Campbell

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #21 on: 22 October, 2021, 12:55:43 PM »
Doesn't need to fire bullets, it's often blanks that kill people

Isn't a blank more or less the propellant part of a round without the actual bullet bit? If there's anything in the barrel when the blank fires, it'll get shot out much the same as a bullet. As was the case, tragically, with Brandon Lee.
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milstar

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #22 on: 28 October, 2021, 08:31:24 PM »
The things with Alec Baldwin are heating up. Personally, whatever opinion I have on him is irrelevant, and I still do not think he should face charges for other people's negligence. But what grinds my gear currently is...seeing other people in particular places of the internet, calling that Alec should be locked up and charged for manslaughter. And it's obvious from where they come from. This is not a political issue, but yet, those very same folks made it to be. The Armorer and the AD definitely are the ones more responsible and should never be allowed to work in the industry again (after they do jail time dearly). One human life is lost thanks to their negligence; the other lies in the hospital. In terms of measuring the blame, those people are higher on the totem pole than Alec. He will probably face some issues and lawsuits and court settling on his own, being the producer he is. But we'll see. All in all, Hollywood needs to reset some of its rules on the set.
Reyt, you lot. Shut up, belt up, 'n if ye can't see t' bloody exit, ye must be bloody blind.

Rara Avis

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #23 on: 28 October, 2021, 08:45:36 PM »
Why was he firing a gun at the cinematographer though?

I think he should bear some responsibility for this.

Funt Solo

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #24 on: 28 October, 2021, 10:28:47 PM »
Why was he firing a gun at the cinematographer though?

Apparently they were after a shot of the protagonist firing towards the camera - which is quite common. Not unusually, the director and the cinematographer were standing close to the camera, so they could view the shot as it unfolded.

All things being equal, I expect the responsibility will lie with the armorer (rather than the actor who relies on the expertise of the armorer).
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Jim_Campbell

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #25 on: 28 October, 2021, 11:06:42 PM »
All things being equal, I expect the responsibility will lie with the armorer (rather than the actor who relies on the expertise of the armorer).

I saw a FB post on this explaining the (correct) on-set firearm procedures and this is 100% on the armourer, if the accounts are correct. The armourer is supposed to check every single prop weapon before it's put into the hands of an actor and confirm that it's safe to use.
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milstar

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #26 on: 28 October, 2021, 11:14:30 PM »
Why was he firing a gun at the cinematographer though?

I think he should bear some responsibility for this.

They were rehearsing a scene, that Funt described. The pistol had live rounds, which was used by crew for shooting beer cans in the spare time, hours before the incident.
Alec Baldwin said he had no idea that live rounds were in and I believe him. Now, I am not exactly sure how movie sets in terms of safety responsibility. Is the actor required to check the gun before holding? Many people told me he is.
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Rara Avis

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #27 on: 29 October, 2021, 05:24:40 AM »
It's confusing .. I thought the first rule of gun safety was always assume it's loaded.

broodblik

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #28 on: 29 October, 2021, 05:30:31 AM »
Yes it is true but the bigger problem most people have never handled a gun before and it can be overwhelming at first. The bigger problem is most people are ignorant on how to handle a gun in a save way. I feel the person responsible for the gun should have given the actors a lesson on how to handle it and the director should have been aware of it and always remind people "safety first"
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Jim_Campbell

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Re: Real life accidents on film/tv sets
« Reply #29 on: 29 October, 2021, 07:50:10 AM »
Again, I saw a post from an actual armourer in film production: it is 100% the armourer's responsibility to check every single firearm before it's put into the hands of anyone else and confirm it's safe for use.

They're supposed to check the magazine/clip/cylinder and the breech, confirm that no live rounds are present, and hand it to the intended user confirming that it's safe for use.

At that point, it's not the actor's job to check it again, because the person who's job it is to make sure it's safe has told them it's safe.
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