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2000 AD => General => : norton canes 23 October, 2021, 05:22:02 PM

: Thought Bubble 2021 submission question
: norton canes 23 October, 2021, 05:22:02 PM
Silly question alert...

The instructions for the 2021 Thought Bubble submissions (https://www.thoughtbubblefestival.com/2000ad) (writing challenge) say "all you need to do is write your own Future Shock and pitch it in a video to an online panel of 2000 AD creators" and "Write your two-minute pitch for a Future Shock. Record a video of yourself reading out your pitch in two minutes or less. Email BOTH your finished video AND your written pitch".

I just wanted to be absolutely sure - you don't email your script?

And if not, should your pitch give away the whole plot, including the twist? I usually take a 'pitch' to be something that teases a story but doesn't give everything away.
: Re: Thought Bubble 2021 submission question
: pauljholden 23 October, 2021, 06:42:56 PM
Give it all away, my friend. But dramatically. Like you're telling someone a super exciting story,

If they like that pitch with the twist, they'll want to see the script.
: Re: Thought Bubble 2021 submission question
: norton canes 23 October, 2021, 07:44:51 PM
Cool. I should say, I am asking for a friend (no, honest!)
: Re: Thought Bubble 2021 submission question
: GordonR 23 October, 2021, 10:48:56 PM
should your pitch give away the whole plot, including the twist? I usually take a 'pitch' to be something that teases a story but doesn't give everything away.

I’ve seen people ask this before about Future Shock pitches, and it kind of confounds me.

Yes, if you’re asking someone to buy your twist-in-the-tail short story, you absolutely have to tell them what the twist is.
: Re: Thought Bubble 2021 submission question
: milstar 23 October, 2021, 11:35:27 PM
Well, shoot. I did a few scripts this summer, planning for when we say goodbye to the lockdown, no way I could do this online. For I am so bloody shy and would stutter like a schoolboy, plus I don't possess a camera, I'd blew it. Although I like the idea of telling your pitch in a 2-3 minutes, more communicative it is, than laying it out on the paper.